2 Enameled Goblets

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Object Name: 
2 Enameled Goblets
Accession Number: 
50.2.8
Dimensions: 
Overall A) H: 22.7 cm; B) H: 21.75 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
about 1760-1770
Web Description: 
The enameling of transparent colorless glass was popular on the Continent after the mid-16th century, but it would be another two centuries before the practice was adopted in England. Great progress with this innovation was made by the Beilby family of craftsmen, which was located in Newcastle upon Tyne. William Beilby (1740-1819) and his younger sister Mary (1749-1797) enameled glasses in the ornate Rococo style from about 1762 until 1774. Early pieces, probably by William, were influenced by the heraldic engravings of his brother, Ralph. They include eight goblets bearing the royal arms of George III. The Beilbys’ later works were decorated with rustic scenes, gardens, and classical ruins. Some of these objects are signed with the surname only, so it is not possible to know which Beilby enameled them. These two signed goblets show the arms, crest, and motto of the earls of Pembroke and Montgomery. They were made for Henry, 10th earl of Pembroke (1733-1794).
Department: 
Provenance: 
Steuben Glass, Inc., Source
1950-10-01
Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery, Former Collection
Primary Description: 
Colorless lead glass; blown. Large bucket bowls supported by applied, tall straight stems with opaque white spirals; applied wide feet with rough pontil marks, thick and nearly flat.
Glass: A Short History (Smithsonian Books edition) (2012) illustrated, pp. 84-85; BIB# 130360
Glass: A Short History (The British Museum edition) (2012) illustrated, pp. 84-85; BIB# 135965
A Short History of Glass (1990 edition) (1990) illustrated, p. 66, #57; BIB# 33211
Story of Glass Coloring Book (1981) illustrated, p. 30; BIB# 67749
Glass (1966) illustrated, frontispiece; BIB# 119578
The Corning Glass Center (1958) illustrated, p. 19 (right); BIB# 26395