Curtain Raiser - Zwischenakt

Title: 
Curtain Raiser - Zwischenakt

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Object Name: 
Stained Glass Panel
Title: 
Curtain Raiser - Zwischenakt
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
88.3.1
Dimensions: 
Frame H: 143.6 cm, W: 190.5 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
1980
Web Description: 
Abstract compositions incorporating a range of colors are characteristic of the stained glass produced in Germany since World War II. The work of German designers such as Ludwig Schaffrath, Johannes Schreiter, and Jochem Poensgen became internationally known. American studio artists were especially influenced by the works of these stained glass designers, which were first exhibited in the United States during the 1970s.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Poensgen, Jochem ((b. 1931)), Former Collection
1988
Category: 
Primary Description: 
Colorless, opal flashed, translucent smoked, orange, green, red, blue, black lead glasses, red and black enamels; cut, leaded, enameled, fired, assembled. Large horizontal panel with geometric striped patterning and trompe l'oeil drapery; general design divided into three wide vertical panels subdivided into smaller horizontal bars, enameled and leaded drapery folds intruding at top and angling in towards the center; horizontal section transverses base and is divided into angled bars of multiple colored glass and enamels; wide wooden frame painted black; enameled in script in lower right red band: "Jochem Poensgen/1980".
Contemporary Stained Glass from the Corning Museum of Glass
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 1988 through 1991
A Short History of Glass (1990 edition) (1990) illustrated, p. 107, #93; BIB# 33211
Masterpieces of Glass: A World History From The Corning Museum of Glass (1990) illustrated, pp. 226-227, pl. 105, jacket back; BIB# 33819
The Corning Museum of Glass Annual Report 1988 (1989) p. 7;