Feuilles de Marronnier en Automne (Chestnut Leaves in Autumn)

Title: 
Feuilles de Marronnier en Automne (Chestnut Leaves in Autumn)

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Object Name: 
Vase
Title: 
Feuilles de Marronnier en Automne (Chestnut Leaves in Autumn)
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
2008.3.122
Dimensions: 
Overall H: 41.6 cm, W: 15 cm, Diam (max): 13.9 cm
Location: 
On Display
Date: 
about 1908
Web Description: 
Daum Frères was the most important French Art Nouveau art glass manufacturer after the Cristallerie Emile Gallé. In 1901, the two companies united with other artists and designers in the Lorraine region to form the influential Ecole de Nancy (School of Nancy).
Department: 
Provenance: 
Christie, Manson & Woods Ltd, Source
Material: 
Inscription: 
28 Octy 2008 / Sale: 7620 / 113 / Chrtistie's
modern label
Sticker On underside of base Rectangular white sticker with black text
XJ 391
modern label
Sticker On underside of base Rectangular white sticker with rounded ends (like a price sticker) with faded black text.
1078 3740
modern label
Sticker On underside of base Rectangular white and black bar code sticker
DAUM / NANCY {cross of Lorraine)
signature
Intaglio On body of vase, near base Signature includes the cross of Lorraine (part of the heraldic arms of Lorraine in eastern France)
Primary Description: 
Yellow glass, brown glass; purple, green, and brown glass powders; mold-blown, cased, hot-applied glass powders, cut, acid-etched. Tall vase with asymmetrical, cut mouth. The vase is of basically cylindrical shape, most narrow at top and expanding to its widest point in the lower third of the base, and then tapering at the base. Three molded chestnuts and leaves appear at the top of the vase; the rest of the base is decorated with large cameo-cut chestnut leaves. The bottom part of the vase has been acid-etched, giving it a rough surface.
The Corning Museum of Glass Annual Report 2008 (2009) illustrated, p. 14;