Finders Creepers

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Object Name: 
Sculpture
Title: 
Finders Creepers
Accession Number: 
86.4.98
Dimensions: 
Overall H: 9.5 cm, W: 37 cm, L: 75 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
1986
Credit Line: 
1st Rakow Commission
Web Description: 
In the mid 1980s, this piece was one of the largest and most complex examples of pâte de verre sculpture that had ever been attempted. Doug Anderson modeled the individual elements of this sculpture, which includes leaves and insects, from life. Pâte de verre (literally "glass paste") is a casting technique in which granulated glass (frit) is heated and fused inside of a kiln. Pâte de verre is easily recognized by its typically "sugary" surface and subtle, yet distinct and often complicated, coloration.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Anderson, Doug (American, b. 1952), Former Collection
1986
to
1986
Rakow Estate, Juliette K. (Mrs. Leonard S.) (d. 1992), Source
1986
Rakow, Leonard S., Source
1986
Technique: 
Inscription: 
Anderson 092486
signature
Primary Description: 
Multicolored pastel lead glass; cast (lost wax), pate de verre. Irregular rectangle; one solid piece of glass with deep undercut, depicting a pile of ivy leaves from which various life-sized elements emerge (vine, garden snake, morel mushrooms, white cap mushrooms, one peanut, two acorns, two strawberries, one button, cicada, one horsefly, rocks, black-eyed Susans, pine cone, two feathers, one apple leaf); coloration provided by gradations within glass (rather than surface applications on colorless); inscribed "Anderson 092486".
Particle Theories: International Pate de Verre and Other Cast Glass Granulations
Venue(s)
Museum of American Glass at Wheaton Village 2005-04 through 2006-01
The Corning Museum of Glass Annual Report 1986 (1987) illustrated, pp. 2-4, 6;
Recent Important Acquisitions, 29 (1987) illustrated, p. 131, #54; BIB# AI19055