Goblet with Cover

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Object Name: 
Goblet with Cover
Accession Number: 
79.3.304
Dimensions: 
Overall H: 29.1 cm, Diam: 9.6 cm
Location: 
On Display
Date: 
1625
Credit Line: 
Gift of The Ruth Bryan Strauss Memorial Foundation
Web Description: 
The tall conical bowl is diamond-point engraved with a formal scroll border above a narrow band that is inscribed "GOT . IST . MEIN . TROST . 1625." (God is my comfort). The Venetian master Ludovico Savonetti, who was related to the glassworkers Salvatore and Bastian or Sebastiano Savonetti, first worked for Archduke Ferdinand at the court glasshouse in Innsbruck. In 1579, he was employed in Vienna. Later that year, he moved on to open a Venetian-style glasshouse in Dessau. The covered goblet, which may have been made at the Dessau glasshouse, is made of potash glass.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Anhalt Family, Former Collection
Dessau, Schloss, Former Collection
Neuberg, Frederick, Former Collection
Strauss Memorial Foundation, Ruth Bryan, Source
1979
Primary Description: 
Transparent olive green non-lead glass; blown, diamond-engraved. Tall conical bowl (a) with diamond-point engraved decoration: formal scroll border above a narrow band with inscription above a band divided into four panels, two with palmettes, two with formal daisies; a band with spiral decoration below, and a formal scrollwork border beneath; hollow inverted baluster stem with disks at top and bottom; thin, spreading foot. Cover (b): flat, circular shape, trailed rim, tapered brim; top with three concentric diamond-point engraved bands; delicate finial composed of a ball knop above a thin baluster and two swelling knops at the base.
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2004-05-13 through 2004-10-17
Beyond Venice: Glass in Venetian Style, 1500-1750 (2004) illustrated, pp. 82-83, no. 11; BIB# 79761