Homage to Palissy: Still Life with Fish

Title: 
Homage to Palissy: Still Life with Fish

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Object Name: 
Platter
Title: 
Homage to Palissy: Still Life with Fish
Accession Number: 
99.3.61
Dimensions: 
Overall H: 7.2 cm, W: 21 cm, L: 29.5 cm
Location: 
On Display
Date: 
1968
Credit Line: 
Gift of The Steinberg Foundation
Web Description: 
Miluse Roubícková (Czech, b. 1922) designed award-winning, commercial glasswares for the Czech national glassworks at Nový Bor and Skrdlovice that were exhibited internationally. This colorful and animated sculptural plate, Homage to Palissy: Still Life with Fish, is typical of her studio glass. It was inspired by the work of Bernard Palissy, a 16th-century French ceramist and glass painter known for his brightly colored faience plates that featured realistic, modeled still lifes of fish and other marine life.
Department: 
Provenance: 
The Steinberg Foundation, Source
1999-12-29
Material: 
Inscription: 
1917
Label
Beneath signature
SF / 838
Label
Fish
MR 68
Signature and date
Bottom of base
Primary Description: 
Colorless, transparent green, yellow-green and red, opaque yellow and yellow orange glass; ovoid conical shape with chevron pattern crimped edge (colorless) holding three glass fish and two yellow and yellow orange blobs and two green bumpy shapes.
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2002-05-16 through 2002-10-21
National Czech and Slovak Museum and Library 2003-02-28 through 2003-09-28
Corning Incorporated Gallery
Czech Glass 1945-1980. Design in an Age of Adversity (2005) illustrated, p. 301, #247; p. 120; BIB# 87054
The Corning Museum of Glass Annual Report 1999 (2000) p. 5;
Recent Important Acquisitions, 42 (2000) illustrated, p. 201, fig. 47; BIB# AI49427
Miluse Roubickova and Rene Roubicek (1983-01) illustrated, p. 16, fig. 16;
Glasrevue ('83/1) (1983)