Maestrale (North wind)

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Object Name: 
Sculptural Vessel
Title: 
Maestrale (North wind)
Accession Number: 
2007.4.205
Dimensions: 
Overall H: 33.7 cm, W: 82 cm, D: 41.8 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
2005
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Ben W. Heineman Sr. Family
Web Description: 
By the 2000s, Zynsky had begun to change her palette and to soften some of her color contrasts with additions of gold, amber, and colorless threads. Throughout her career, she has enjoyed the teamwork necessary for most glassworking processes, yet her “filet de verre” technique also allows her to work alone on individual pieces. Exceptions to this are the very large forms, such as the Museum’s Maestrale, which was commissioned by Ben and Natalie Heineman in 2005. This vessel was so large that she needed extra assistants to help her get the piece in and out of the kiln during its firing cycle.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Habatat Galleries Inc., Former Collection
2005
Heineman, Ben W. Sr. Family, Source
Category: 
Material: 
Inscription: 
Z
signature
Imbedded with Black Glass underside
Primary Description: 
Fused and thermo-formed glass threads (filet de verre).
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2011-04-02 through 2011-12-04
A pioneer of the studio glass movement, Toots Zynsky draws from the traditions of painting, sculpture and the decorative arts to inspire her innovative, intricate vessels. Masters of Studio Glass: Toots Zynsky, featured 12 works representing the varied techniques and inspirations from throughout Zynsky’s career. Zynsky attended the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), where she was one of acclaimed artist Dale Chihuly’s first students. In 1971, she was part of a group of Chihuly’s friends and RISD students who founded the influential Pilchuck Glass School in Washington State. There, she made installations of slumped plate glass, and later experimented with video and performance work with artist Buster Simpson, incorporating hot and cold glass. This experimental work was critical to the development of using glass as a material to explore issues in contemporary art.
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass
Contemporary Glass Gallery and Changing Exhibitions Gallery
 
2010 Summer Exhibitions (2010) illustrated, p. 1, #2;
Voices of Contemporary Glass: The Heineman Collection (2009-09) illustrated, p. 26;
Voices of Contemporary Glass: The Heineman Collection (2009) illustrated, cover; pp. 247, pl. 235; BIB# 109983
Treasures from the Corning Museum of Glass (2008-12) illustrated, October;
The Corning Museum of Glass Annual Report 2007 (2008) illustrated, p. 45; BIB# AI90242