Plate

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Object Name: 
Plate
Accession Number: 
55.4.307
Dimensions: 
Overall H: 4.6 cm, Diam: 34.2 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
1958
Primary Description: 
Plate. Colorless non-lead glass, translucent dark green and pale yellow enamels; cut, ground, kiln-formed--slumped (sheet steel mold), reverse enameled--powdered enamels sifted and manipulated, fired. Low circular dish with curved walls and asymmetrical pattern, overall exterior of dish has been decorated with granular coloration of green radiating and spiraling lines over a pale yellow background; center has a broad green circle with overall pattern of small yellow dots in triangular groups of three, center also is colored with yellow that fades out towards edge of plate; narrow rays (some straight, some undulating) of green spiral from the center circle to exterior edge of dish, a second layer of rays spirals in the opposite direction creating a plaited effect, spiral ends with a 1/2 ray where a third layer would begin; flattened circular base; scribed through the enamel before firing near edge of base, reading from front: "M.H."; also on base in orange (ink or enamel?) and visible only from the back: "CG1".
Department: 
Provenance: 
Heaton, Maurice (American, born Switzerland, 1900-1990), Source
1955
Material: 
Inscription: 
CG1
inscription
base
M. H.
signature
scribed through enamel before firing near edge of base
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2003-09-22 through 2004-03-01
Corning Incorporated Gallery 2004-06-17 through 2004-10-03
Contemporary American Glass
Venue(s)
National Gallery of Art 1956-01-18 through 1956-02-19
Metropolitan Museum of Art 1956-03-09 through 1956-04-08
Exhibition held at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., January 18-February 19, 1956 and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, March 9-April 8, 1956.