The Russian Forest

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Object Name: 
Sculptural in 6 parts
Title: 
The Russian Forest
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
91.3.12
Dimensions: 
(A) H: 29.5 cm, D: 13.3 cm, L: 29.5 cm, H(with metal): 29.9; (Aab) H: 65.3 cm, W: 21.6; (Bab) H: 63.2 cm, W: 24.7 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
1990
Primary Description: 
Colorless lead glass; blown into mold, ground, polished, engraved. Group of broadly engraved hollow cylinders (different heighths, same diameter) depicting forest scene, background with intermittent mottling; two tallest cylinders have tops ground and polished flat and two metal pins on lower section which support two more blown sections with conical tops, narrow openings, and applied blown sections suggesting tree branches; (Aa) lower double cylinder section depicts large tree with extended limb stump on lower section, broadly carved branches; inscribed in block letters near base edge: "IA"; (Ab) upper section has stylized cat-like animal with elongated tufted ears (possibly a lynx) and three applied blown sections; (Ba) lower section of double vessel has one blown "branch", carved tree trunk and branches and a bird with outstretched wings; (Bb) upper section has five blown extensions and a squirrel leaping from one branch to another; three remaining smaller single sections have ground and polished angled tops and carved tree trunks and branches on walls; (B) tallest depicts bird with fanned tail on angled surface; (C) depicts bird with outstretched wings on angled surface and a male figure with a fur hat swinging an axe on the walls; (D) third section has tree branches on angled surface and a large bear on the walls; open bases ground and polished flat.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Ivanov, Alexander ((b. 1944)), Source
1990-06-15
The Corning Museum of Glass Annual Report 1991 (1992) p. 10;
New Glass Review, 10 (1989) illustrated, p. 18, #41;
The Corning Museum of Glass Annual Report 1981 (1982) p. 4;