Sculpture

What is AAT?

The Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) (r) is a structured vocabulary for generic concepts related to art and architecture. It was developed by The Getty Research Institute to help research institutions become consistent in the terminology they use.Learn More

Object Name: 
Sculpture
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
98.3.13
Dimensions: 
Overall H: 32.3 cm, W: 16.7 cm, Diam: 12.7 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
1966-1969
Credit Line: 
Gift of the artist
Web Description: 
The tall Hand, symbol of creation and humanity, emphasizes Eisch’s belief in the importance of mindful experience. “We have to leave the realm of commodities and objects and compulsory behavior, and return to the essential quality of life,” Eisch says. “We have to learn to see again, to catch on, to grasp. . . . Knowledge and education have flooded us with light, but at the same time, our shadows and darkness have been taken away, our mysteries and myths banished.”
Department: 
Provenance: 
Eisch, Erwin ((German, b. 1927)), Source
1998-03-02
Color: 
Material: 
Inscription: 
ZAVENTEM/ BELG-LUXEMB E.U. DOUANE ACC/ D.
label
bottom
27C
label
bottom
Primary Description: 
Translucent purple and bluish purple glass with purple inclusions; blown, tooled, iridized.
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2012-03-15 through 2013-02-03
Masters of Studio Glass: Erwin Eisch is a special exhibition of 22 vessels and sculptures by one of the founders of studio glass in Europe, Erwin Eisch (German, b. 1927). The exhibition recognizes Eisch for his achievements in developing glass as a material for artistic expression, and it celebrates the 50th anniversary of the birth of studio glass in the United States. Eisch, a close friend of American Studio Glass founder, Harvey K. Littleton (American, b. 1922), had a profound influence on the development of American, as well as European, studio glass. Objects in the exhibition span 40 years of Eisch’s career in glass from 1964 to 2004. His works are tradition-breaking, and his radical thoughts about art reflect the unorthodox approach to glass that has characterized his work throughout his career. All of the works presented are drawn from the Museum’s collection.
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2005-11-17 through 2006-04-02
Corning Incorporated Gallery 2006-07-12 through 2007-01-06