Vase

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Object Name: 
Vase
Accession Number: 
97.1.12
Dimensions: 
Overall H (max): 20.1 cm, Diam (max): 5.9 cm; Rim Diam: 4.7 cm; Base Diam (max): 5.8 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
300-499
Web Description: 
This object belongs to a distinctive group of glasses, each of which has at least three of the following characteristics: (1) the body was blown in a mold; (2) the foot-ring was formed by coiling a trail of molten glass; (3) if there is a handle, it is shaped like a wishbone and has a notched "tail" that reaches almost to the foot; (4) after it had been cracked off, the rim received no further attention; and (5) the glass is deep blue. Objects of this type were probably made in the eastern Mediterranean region between the mid-fourth and mid-fifth centuries A.D. About 30 examples have been published. Those with known find-places come from Syria, the Crimea, Sudan, and South Korea.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Antiquarium, Ltd., Source
1997-03-26
Category: 
Primary Description: 
Deep blue, transparent glass; blown, applied. Vase: pear-shaped,slender, slightly lopsided. Rim outsplayed and turned up, then cracked off and ground; neck slender, tapering then splaying and merging with wall; lower part of wall curves in toward bottom; base is splayed footring consisting of one trail wound in three and one-half revolutions, then flattened. Glass contains bubbles, many of which are elongated, up to 1.2 cm long.
Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass, Volume Three (2003) illustrated, p. 152, #1157; pp. 153, 229; BIB# 58895
Roman Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass, Volume Three (2003) illustrated, p. 152, #1157; pp. 153, 229; BIB# 58895
Recent Important Acquisitions, 40 (1998) illustrated, p. 142, #4; BIB# AI40492
The Corning Museum of Glass Annual Report 1997 (1998) illustrated, p. 8, left;