Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ

Hot Glass Demos

Amenities

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Can I bring my pet to the Museum?/ Do you allow dogs in the Museum?

Service animals are more than welcome in the Museum. However, we do not allow pets. There are multiple pet boarding services in the Corning area, for a listing, see here.

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Can I park my RV in your parking lot overnight?

Because we have so many visitors, we can't accommodate RVs in our lot overnight, although you are welcome to park there during your visit to the Museum. However, there are a number of RV camps in the area. Visit the Steuben County Conference and Visitors Bureau for more information.

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Can I smoke in The Corning Museum of Glass?

No. The Corning Museum of Glass is a smoke-free facility. Visitors may smoke outside if they wish.

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Can visitors access the Internet here?

Yes. The Museum campus has free public wireless internet access (WiFi) in most areas including the Café, the Rakow Research Library and The Studio. The signal may be weaker in some areas than others.

Follow these instructions to connect on your Android device:
Go to Settings and touch “Wireless and networks.” Touch “Wi-Fi settings.” Touch to turn on your device’s Wi-Fi setting. Select “GlassApp & Free WiFi” from the list of Wi-Fi networks.

Follow these instructions to connect on your Apple device:
Open the Settings app and touch “Wi-Fi.” Make sure Wi-Fi is ON. Touch “GlassApp & Free WiFi” from the list of available networks.
For more information see Mobile FAQs.

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Do you have an automated teller machine (ATM)?

Yes. We have an automated teller machine (ATM) that is located on the Lower Level, adjacent to the Café.

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Do you have strollers available?

Strollers are not available from the Museum, but we do encourage and allow their use in the Museum.

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Do you have wheelchairs available?

Yes. The Museum is wheelchair accessible, and wheelchairs are available at no charge on a first-come, first-served basis. Please ask a Guest Services Team Member or a security guard for assistance. We regret that wheelchairs may not be reserved in advance.

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I lost an item at the Museum, what should I do?

All lost and found items are collected at the admissions desk. While at the Museum, please visit the admissions desk to report or claim a lost item. From outside the Museum, call +1 (800) 732-6845 or +1 (607) 937-5371 to determine if your item has been found.

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What are your payment options?

We accept cash and Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express credit cards. We do NOT accept personal checks or travelers checks.

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Where can I find something to eat?

The Café is located at the rear of the Museum Shops and is open year-round. It offers hot entrees, pizza, soups, salads, and sandwiches, as well as beer, wine, freshly prepared Gimme! coffee, espresso, and other hot and cold beverages. See today's menu.

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Where should I park?

Primary parking is available in a lot just off I-86, Exit 46. Watch for CMoG banners and a Welcome Center. A free shuttle bus runs continuously from the Welcome Center to the Museum and to the Rockwell Museum, as well as downtown Corning, where you'll find Historic Market Street shops and restaurants.

Tourism

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Can you recommend a place to stay?

See our listing of hotel packages, or visit the websites of Finger Lakes Wine Country and Steuben County Conference and Visitors Bureau for information regarding local events, lodging, and attractions in the region. The Corning area features many excellent hotels, motels, and RV parks, which accommodate hundreds of thousands of visitors each year.

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Do you have a dumping waste station for RV's in the area?

Ferenbaugh, a campsite nearby, can take care of your needs. (A fee is charged.)

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How many people live in Corning?

The Greater Corning Area has a population of about 26,000. This includes the surrounding communities of Riverside, Painted Post, and Erwin.

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I use diesel fuel. Where can I purchase it in Corning?

At Black's Sunoco Station on West Pultney St. near Route 414.

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What is the building across the river?

The large black contemporary glass building is the world headquarters for Corning Incorporated. It is an office building, and it is not open to the public. You may note the architectural detail at the top of the headquarters building, which resembles a V-shaped structure known as a Robertson Ventilator. It doesn't serve any function, but rather is an architectural gesture acknowledging Corning Incorporated's history as a glassworks.

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What is the name of the river flowing through Corning and where does it flow?

Corning sits on the banks of the Chemung River. The Chemung River starts in Painted Post at the juncture of the Cohocton and Tioga rivers. It flows southeast and eventually joins the Susquehanna River.

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What is the purpose of that tall white tower in the middle of your town, and what is it?

The tower was originally the Tube Draw Tower. Erected in 1912, it was used to draw glass tube for making thermometers. It was restored in 2000, and today it is a local landmark known regionally as "Little Joe" for the iconic glassblower painted on its side.

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What's nearby? (What else can I do in the Corning area?)

Events and activities are offered throughout the region, all year long. Visit these websites to learn more about things to do in the Finger Lakes region:

Corning's Gaffer District, including Historic Market Street
Finger Lakes Wine Country
Finger Lakes Region

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Why did the Corning Glass Works develop their company here?

It was attracted by ample coal and fuel and good transportation facilities, both rail and canal.

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Why is the town called Corning and which was named first, the town or the company?

The City of Corning was named first. The City of Corning was named after a financier by the name of Erastus Corning. When the Brooklyn Flint Glass Works moved here in the late 1860s from Brooklyn, NY, it was renamed the Corning Glass Works. The company now is named Corning Incorporated.

Mobile

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Does the Museum have a mobile site?

Yes, visit www.cmog.org/mobile on your iPhone, Android or other mobile device for an optimized view of www.cmog.org.

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How do I access free WiFi at the Museum on an Android device?

Follow these instructions to connect on your Android device:
Go to Settings and touch “Wireless and networks.” Touch “Wi-Fi settings.” Touch to turn on your device’s Wi-Fi setting. Select “GlassApp & Free WiFi” from the list of Wi-Fi networks.

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How do I access free WiFi at the Museum using an iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad?

Follow these instructions to connect on your Apple device:
Open the Settings app and touch “Wi-Fi.” Make sure Wi-Fi is ON. Touch “GlassApp & Free WiFi” from the list of available networks.

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How do I access GlassApp?

Access GlassApp by connecting to the "GlassApp & Free WiFi" network in the Museum, or visit http://glassapp.cmog.org in the web browser on your iPhone, Android, other mobile device, desktop, laptop, or tablet. You do not need to be connected to WiFi to access GlassApp, it can also be accessed in your smartphone's internet browser using cellular data. 

Follow these instructions to connect on your Apple device in the Museum:
Open the Settings app and touch “Wi-Fi.” Make sure Wi-Fi is ON. Touch “GlassApp & Free WiFi” from the list of available networks. Touch "Connect." Touch "Proceed to GlassApp."

Follow these instructions to connect on your Android device in the Museum:
Go to Settings and touch “Wireless and networks.” Touch “Wi-Fi settings.” Touch to turn on your device’s Wi-Fi setting. Select “GlassApp & Free WiFi” from the list of Wi-Fi networks. Touch "Connect." You are now connected to the WiFi, open your internet browser and enter the URL http://glassapp.cmog.org.

To access GlassApp off The Corning Museum of Glass campus, visit http://glassapp.cmog.org in the web browser on your iPhone, Android, other mobile device, desktop, laptop, or tablet.

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Is WiFi available in the Museum?

Yes. The Museum campus has free public wireless internet access (WiFi) in most areas including the Museum Café, the Rakow Research Library and The Studio. Connect to “GlassApp & Free WiFi” from the list of available Wi-Fi networks. The signal may be weaker in some areas than others.

Curatorial and Collections

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Can I bring my object to the Museum for identification or donation?

For the safety and security of your glass, we ask that you please do not bring objects to the Museum for identification or donation. Our Curatorial department can review objects based on images submitted using our Ask a Glass Object Question system. For additional information on glass identification, please see our Glass Identification Policies.

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Can I donate or sell glass to the Museum?

All potential acquisitions are reviewed by our curatorial team in accordance with our collections policy. Discussion with or interest from a curator is not a guarantee of acceptance. If you are interested in donating or selling your glass object to the Museum, please submit the following information using Ask a Glass Object Question: images of the object (including a detail of any signature or inscription), the history of the object (including how and when you acquired it), and any additional research or information known.

Please note: We will only consider acquisitions requests submitted in writing by mail or email. For the safety and security of the object, do not mail or bring objects to the museum.

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Can The Corning Museum of Glass identify my glass object?

Our Curatorial team aims to identify as many objects within our areas of specialty as possible. Please note that we can only identify objects made from or related to glass. For additional information about our policies and procedures for glass identification, please go to www.cmog.org/glass-questions.

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Can you identify my Pyrex?

Because of the amount of Pyrex that has been produced in the past 100 years, there is simply too much for us to know everything. We recommend checking our Pyrex Potluck website and associated resources to get you started. The Rakow Research Library’s Ask a Glass Question service also archives many Pyrex-related questions.

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Can you tell me how much my glass is worth, or how rare it is?

The Museum does not provide a monetary value for any objects, nor do we comment on rarity in object identifications. The Rakow Research Library has a list of resources for finding a reputable appraiser. Remarks by Corning Museum of Glass staff are not authentications and may not be used as a basis for appraisals.

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Can you tell me more about an object in your collection?

The almost 50,000 objects in the permanent collection of The Corning Museum of Glass are accessible through our online Collections. Although information available about each object varies, in most cases you will find a photograph, description, place and date made, artist, provenance, and whether it is on display. If you’re conducting specific research related to an object in our collection, please contact us using the Ask a Glass Object Question page.

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Someone in my family donated glass to the Museum. How do I find out more about it?

Start by searching the online Collections for your family name. If you are still unsure or would like additional information, please contact us at Ask a Glass Object Question.

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What is a curator?

A museum curator is a specialist who is responsible for acquiring, exhibiting, cataloguing and researching objects in the museum’s permanent collection, and helping to build the permanent collection by researching and proposing new acquisitions. Curators also help develop and organize exhibitions, answer public inquiries, and give tours and lectures. The Corning Museum of Glass has curators for ancient and Islamic glass, European glass, American glass, Modern and Contemporary glass, and science and technology, as well as two curatorial assistants.  Curators work closely with other collections management staff including registrars, conservators, photographers, and preparators to ensure the long term preservation, safety, and accessibility of the collection for visitors, artists, and researchers to enjoy.

About the Museum

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Can I commission glassmakers at The Corning Museum of Glass to make artwork for me?

The Museum’s glassmaking demonstrations are for educational purposes only. There are many talented glass artists in the United States who do accept commissions. Try searching the internet for a glass maker in your area. You can also purchase artwork made by Corning area artists from The Shops at The Corning Museum of Glass.

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Can I see Corningware being made? Can I go into your factories?

Corning Incorporated no longer manufactures Corningware. They sold the consumer products division to World Kitchen in 1998. The Corning Museum of Glass is not part of Corning Incorporated and does not involve any factory or research facility tours.

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Do we see optical fiber here?

Guests can learn all about glass technology in the Glass Innovation Center, which contains three galleries: Windows, Vessels and Optics (which includes an interactive exhibit specifically on fiber optics).

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Do you have tours?

The Museum offers one-hour family-friendly tours daily, from Memorial Day through October, and during winter and spring breaks; see the calendar for dates and times. Special exhibition tours are also available throughout the year. We have a self-guided tour through the Museum, available any time during our operating hours. If you would like to schedule a guided tour, contact 607.438.5113 at least two weeks ahead of time. All guided tours are subject to Docent availability. The Museum also accommodates group tours (20 or more people).

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How many objects are in the Museum's collection?

The Museum has nearly 50,000 objects in its collection. It houses the most comprehensive and celebrated collection of glass in the world. Search the collection, or see highlights of the Galleries.

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Is Corning Glass Center now being called Corning Museum of Glass, and is it located in the same place as it always has been?

The Corning Museum of Glass opened in 1951. In 1998, it expanded its activities to include those of the Corning Glass Center. The entire campus is now called The Corning Museum of Glass.

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May I take pictures and videos in the Museum and may I use a flash?

Flash photography is not allowed in the galleries. Photography, using existing light (no flash), is permitted for personal use only. To protect the artwork, no selfie sticks may be used in the Museum building.

No flash or tripods may be used. No photography is permitted in special exhibition areas without special permission by the Museum's Executive Director. These areas are marked with "Do Not Photograph" signs. All photography for commercial use is strictly prohibited.

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What do you use to keep the glass cases so clean? Is it just Windex or something special that you mix up?

While other manufacturers and distributors also provide suitable materials, for the glass exhibition %%cases%%, we use ""ZEP 40"" Non-streaking Glass Cleaner, which is clear, non-ammonia cleaner, basically made of deionized (or distilled) water and isopropyl alcohol (probably about 90% water, although the manufacturer does not disclose exact proportions).

To wash glass objects themselves (the ones that can be safely washed), we use a non-ionic dilute conservation-grade detergent, warm tap water, and rinse thoroughly in deionized water. Commercially, Ivory Liquid Clear is a suitable soap. One should avoid any soaps or detergents with color (dyes), perfumes, and ammonia, including Windex.

All chemicals, including soaps, should be used in accordance with the manufacturer's recommended guidelines and their Material and Safety Data Sheets. They must also be used in compliance with U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA) regulations.

Disclaimer: These are the recommendations of our Conservator, who has lectured and published extensively on the cleaning and care of glass objects. The author and The Corning Museum of Glass make no representations concerning products or services, nor are responsible for their misuse. The materials listed are for informational purposes only.

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What does the CMoG symbol stand for?

The CMoG symbol could be a stylized representation of a glory hole, the hole in the side of a glass furnace, used to reheat glass objects while they are being made, but there is no official meaning. In a July 1978 letter from Arthur A. Houghton, a past president of Steuben who was influential to the Corning Glass Center's development, to Otto W. Hilbert, a Corning Glass Works employee, Houghton stated:

We felt the need of an identifying symbol that would be equally effective if large (as on a highway sign) or small (as on a match box cover or as a printer’s logo.) It was strong, simple, colorful and easily identified and remembered.

The original logo was similar to the current “bull’s eye” design, but featured a blue outer ring, then a white ring, and a red center ring, which connected to the blue ring with a straight line.

From that moment to this I have not the vaguest idea what the symbol signifies. You are quite free to interpret the arcane meaning of this masterpiece of art in any way that you wish. If people wonder what it is, and talk and argue at length about it, what more could we want?

The logo was redrawn and rendered in one color in 1999. The symbol was redrawn to be in proportion with the letterforms used in the square “CMOG” logo.

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What is the relationship between Corning Incorporated and the Museum?

The Corning Museum of Glass is a private, non-profit foundation, generously supported by Corning Incorporated. The Museum is one of many organizations nationwide that benefit from the philanthropic activities of Corning Incorporated according to the foundation law of 1969.

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Who was the original architect? Who was the architect of the building that houses the Art and History Galleries?

Harrison and Abromowitz designed the original building in 1951. Gunnar Birkerts designed the building housing the Art and History Galleries, completed in 1980. The Glass Innovation Center and the rest of the Museum's $65 million transformation was designed by architects Smith-Miller+Hawkinson with assistance from the exhibit design firm of Ralph Applebaum and Associates. It opened in 2001.

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Will we be able to see glassblowing?

Yes. We offer live glassmaking demonstrations throughout the day, every day. You can even Make Your Own Glass souvenir for a small fee.

Conservation

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Can someone at the Museum repair my glass for me?

No, unfortunately, we do not offer this service. However, the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC) has a listing of conservators who may be able to help. Find a conservator.

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Can you use glass or glassworking techniques to repair glass?

The short answer is “no.” Heating any glass is dangerous. Glass is very sensitive to sudden temperature changes which can cause it to shatter or crack. Heating can also cause a piece to change shape or color. Making new glass pieces to fill losses in an object is not feasible because it is nearly impossible to create the exact shape and size that is needed.

Cold-working techniques, such as polishing, are not used because they remove original material from the object and (minutely) change the dimensions/shape of the object. They also put added stress on objects which could cause further damage. Very rarely a contemporary art work, in which a perfect surface is integral to the meaning of the piece, may be re-polished by a skilled glass worker and often with the artist’s involvement.

In the past people have used fragments from similar ancient glass to fill in losses in almost complete objects or even joined two partial objects to create a “complete” object, but these practices are no longer considered acceptable.

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How do you clean the glass?

Glass objects that can be safely washed (most objects in the collection except ancient and some modern and composite objects) are washed with tap water and a mild conservation-grade detergent (any mild detergent without dyes or perfumes would work), followed by thorough rinsing with de-ionized or distilled water. The glass is then either toweled dry with paper towels or air dried. For some objects, like bottles with narrow openings, the inside is rinsed with a small amount of acetone to help remove moisture. Old adhesives from previous repairs or labels are removed with solvents, mostly acetone, ethanol, or a petroleum distillate like naphtha.

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How do you make the glue lines disappear?

Breaks and cracks in glass become visible because light moves through the air that is trapped in the crack differently than through the glass. Because light moves through materials with similar refractive indexes in similar ways, we can minimize the visibility of glue lines by using an adhesive that has a refractive index similar to glass. Glasses of different compositions have different refractive indexes. Lead glass, for example, has a higher refractive index than soda-lime glass. Luckily there are two stable epoxy resins that we can use to repair glass, one with a refractive index close to lead glass and the other with a refractive index close to soda glass. When the refractive index of the glass and the glue are very close and the break edges are clean and undamaged, the glue lines are almost invisible.

On close inspection, fine lines are still always visible along the break edges, as a result of microscopic chips missing from the very edges of the breaks.

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How long does an average glass conservation treatment take?

The time it takes to do one conservation treatment can differ greatly. A simple treatment can take as little as 15 minutes, while a very complicated one can take hundreds of hours over many months. Most treatments take between 10 and 30 hours of active work over a period of several months. Many of the materials we use require long setting times, so we can’t do an entire treatment at once. Sometimes we can only glue one fragment a day. The treatment ends up taking months, but we’re really only working on it for a few minutes a day. This is one of the reasons we usually work on several objects at a time.

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What do you do when there are missing pieces?

Many of the objects that come into the lab for treatment have missing pieces. The first step is to examine the object and decide whether or not those losses need to be filled. People expect to see damage on archaeological objects, so losses in archaeological glass are often not filled, especially if they are small and don’t distract from the overall appearance of the object. If there are many losses or large losses that interfere with the structural stability or interpretation of the object, at least some of the losses need to be filled.

Fills are made out of synthetic resin, usually epoxy, which is dyed to match the color of the glass. We use several techniques to make the fills, but most are a done through a casting and molding process either directly on the object or with a plaster intermediary fill. If handles or other decorative elements are missing we can sometimes make a mold of a matching element on the object itself or from an identical object. If we don’t have a good idea of what the missing element looked like, we won’t make a replacement for it. Similarly, if the missing area has painted or enameled decoration, we only reproduce it on our fill if we are certain of what was there. For example, we would continue a repeated geometric pattern or line, but we would not re-create a figure.

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What is the difference between restoration and conservation?

Confusion sometimes arises about the terms “restoration” and “conservation.” Restoration is actually a type of conservation treatment. Specifically it refers to an attempt to bring an object closer to its original appearance. The other type of conservation treatment is stabilization, which refers to an attempt to prevent further deterioration of an object. In all conservation treatments the integrity of the object and maintaining as much of the original material as possible is important.

In glass conservation, a stabilization treatment might include re-assembling the fragments of a broken object, but not making any fills to replace the missing pieces unless they are needed for structural support. A restoration treatment would include making fills to replace the missing fragments so that the object looks whole once again. Conservators do not want to deceive anyone into believing an object is undamaged when it’s not, but the repairs also should not distract from the object itself. As a general rule, restorations should be invisible/unnoticeable from 6 feet away, but visible (to a trained eye) from 6 inches away.

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What is the oldest thing you have worked on?

Astrid van Giffen, Assistant Conservator:

The oldest thing I personally have worked on is actually not glass. It was a Greek ceramic vase from about 700-900 B.C.

The oldest glass I’ve worked on was probably a Roman piece dating to 200-499 A.D.

 

The Studio

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Can I make reservations for a Make Your Own Glass experience?

Yes, in fact, we recommend that you sign up online before you visit the Museum, as spots fill very quickly, especially during school breaks, weekends and in the summer. You can also make same-day or advance reservations by calling 607.438.5000.

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Do I need a ticket to go into The Studio?

The Studio is part of the Museum, but admission to this facility, along with the Museum Shops, the Carder Gallery and the Rakow Research Library, is free. However, there is a charge for Make Your Own Glass projects.

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Do you have information on courses at The Studio?

Yes. Visit Glassmaking Classes at The Studio or call 607.438.5100 for information.

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What is The Studio? Where is The Studio located?

The Studio is the Museum's internationally renowned teaching facility. In addition to offering college-level glassmaking courses, The Studio also offers Museum visitors an opportunity to try glassmaking themselves at the Make Your Own Glass workshop. The Studio is located directly across from the rear entrance of the Museum. Ask a CMoG employee for directions.

Make Your Own Glass

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Are Make Your Own Glass experiences included in Museum admission?

Make Your Own Glass experiences are not included in general Museum admission. Make Your Own Glass experiences range in cost from $12 to $46 depending on the specific project you choose. If you are not visiting the Museum and only wish to participate in a Make Your Own Glass experience, then you do not need to purchase a general Museum admission.

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Can I change my mind and make another project when I get to The Studio?

Please be sure of the Make Your Own Glass experience that you would like to make before you place your reservation. However, you are able to change your mind within the same project category of the same price point. For example, if you originally signed up to make an ornament but decide later that you would prefer to make a sculpture we can accommodate your request as they are both glassblowing projects. If you wish to switch from making an ornament to something other than glassblowing then this is entirely dependent on our availability and we cannot guarantee you a spot.

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Can I help my child with their project? Will I be allowed in the same area as my child?

Due to space constraints we can only allow one chaperone per ticket holder to accompany those who may need additional assistance with their project. The Main Make Your Own Glass Workshop is designed so that parents may see all of their children doing a project even if the projects are different. During busy times of the year additional workshop areas are open, during these times it may not always be possible to watch several projects taking place at the same time.

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Can I make more than one project in 40 minutes?

If you would like to make more than one project in the allotted 40 minutes then we ask that they be the same item. Tickets must be purchased for each item. For example, you may make two ornaments in the same class (depending on availability) but you cannot make an ornament and a bead. You can make a maximum of 3 glassblowing projects per session (again, they must be the same project) or 2 beads/pendants per session. Additionally, only one sandblasting or fusing project may be booked per 40 minute session.

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Can I pick up my project before noon the following day?

Your Make Your Own Glass project will be available at noon or after the following day. We cannot guarantee that your project will be ready before this time due to our slow cooling process called annealing. Each project needs an adequate amount of time to cool slowly and evenly otherwise the glass can crack or even break.

If you participate in the final two flameworking (bead or pendant) classes of the day, you will need to allow for two days of cooling as these projects go through a much more involved cooling process. We offer free shipping for the beads and pendants made during these sessions and will supply you with an envelope.

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Can I take pictures of my family participating in the MYoG experience?

Yes, photography is allowed in the Make Your Own Glass Studio. We ask that you stand behind the glass barrier to take your pictures so as not to crowd the Studio staff and other guests participating in a Make Your Own Glass experience. For your safety, no selfie sticks may be used in the Make Your Own Glass Studio. 

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Can two people share one Make Your Own Glass experience?

Two people cannot share one Make Your Own Glass experience. We have a “one person per project” rule to minimize the number of people moving close to the hot furnaces and torches. You are still able to watch someone participating in a project at a safe distance behind our glass barrier.

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Do I need to make reservations for a Make Your Own Glass experience?

We strongly suggest that you make reservations for a Make Your Own Glass experience ahead of time using our online reservation system (http://reservations.cmog.org) or by calling us directly at the Studio at 800.732.6845 (press 2) or 607.438.5000 (direct line). We cannot guarantee availability during school breaks and holidays. Payment is due at the time of placing your reservation.

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Does my AAA, 55+, or Membership discount apply to my Make Your Own Glass experience?

Unfortunately, we offer no discounts on the Make Your Own Glass experiences. The AAA, 55+, College and Military discounts only apply to general Museum admission.

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How long does a Make Your Own Glass experience take?

A Make Your Own Glass experience can take up to 40 minutes. Within this time there is a brief instruction from The Studio staff. The remainder of the time is for you to complete your project. We ask that you arrive for your experience at least 10 minutes prior to the start time. This is especially important during school breaks, holidays and the summer months as our Studio is much busier during these times.

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I purchased my Make Your Own Glass tickets online, where do I pick them up?

If you purchased your Make Your Own Glass tickets online you can pick them up at the Admissions Lobby desk. The Guest Services staff will find your reservation and print your tickets. You should bring a printed copy of your reservation confirmation in case there are any problems with your reservation. You may also check in at the desk directly inside the doors of The Studio. We recommend checking-in at The Studio if it is less than 20 minutes prior to your reserved time.

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Is glassblowing really ALL ages?

Yes, we offer a selection of Make Your Own Glass experiences (sculpture, ornament and some seasonal items) for participants of all ages. If you are still unsure if your child is old enough to blow glass then ask yourself, “Can they follow directions? Can they blow out a birthday candle?” If the answer is yes, then your child will be able to make a blown glass project.

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Is there a fee to watch my family or friends make glass?

There is no fee to watch others participate in a Make Your Own Glass experience. You may stand behind the glass barrier and watch your family/friends make their glass. Additionally, the Frederick Carder Gallery is directly next to the Make Your Own Glass Studio (free to the public) that you can walk through while you wait.

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My child has special needs, how do I make arrangements for assistance?

If your child has special needs you may call us ahead of time so our staff can be prepared to best accommodate your child. Depending on availability, we may be able to schedule your child for a quieter time of day (first or last appointments of the day, typically) so they can get the most out of their experience.

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We are only visiting for 1 ½ hours, will I have time to make my own glass?

We recommend planning for each Make Your Own Glass experience to take 40 minutes. There is a lot to see and do at the Museum, so we recommend allowing 2-3 hours for your visit. If you have limited time, our Guest Services staff can assist you in planning the most efficient way to see as much of the Museum as possible.

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What if I can’t pick up my glass tomorrow?

If you cannot pick up your glass the following day we will hold your projects for up to 30 days. If you think you will be returning after 30 days, please call The Studio at 800.732.6845 (press 2) or 607.438.5000 (direct line) so that we can continue to hold it for you. We also offer shipping starting at $18. 

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What is your shipping policy?

If you are unable to pick up your projects the day following your Make Your Own Glass experience, we offer shipping within the United States, starting at $18. The cost will increase depending on the shipping distance and/or the weight of the package. We also offer shipping to Canada at a flat rate of $30. We cannot ship to other international addresses at this time.

We must ship to a home address and cannot ship glass projects to a hotel (if you are traveling for an extended period of time). Additionally, with the exception of flameworking projects (beads and pendants), we are not able to ship to P.O. boxes.

If you are not sure of your travel plans, you can add shipping at a later time by calling The Studio directly at at 800.732.6845 (press 2) or 607.438.5000 (direct line). You will be asked for payment over the phone.

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Where is The Studio?

The Studio entrance is located at 1 Museum Way in Corning, NY, on the Museum campus. It is a separate building from the main Museum. A small parking lot separates the two buildings with a designated walkway running in between. If you check-in at the Admissions Lobby our Guest Services staff will provide you with a map and directions to The Studio. From the Admissions Lobby, it takes approximately 5 minutes to walk to The Studio. View a map.

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Why can’t I take my Make Your Own Glass project home with me right away?

With the exception of sandblasting, all of our hot glass projects need to stay overnight. In order to avoid cracks and breaks in your glass the projects need to undergo a slow and even cooling process called annealing. This process takes place in a separate furnace and your project will be available for pick-up or shipping the following day.

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Why do some Make Your Own Glass projects have age restrictions?

Due to the nature of some of the experiences we have put age restrictions in place to ensure that participants are safe and have the proper skill-level to complete the project. Glassforming and flameworking Make Your Own Glass experiences require you to work very closely to the hot glass/flame. It is important that participants are old enough to follow directions and work with caution. For everyone’s safety, please be sure that the people signing up are the proper age to participate in the more advanced experiences.

Rakow Library

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Are librarians available to help with my questions?

Yes. Use our Ask a Librarian service available on the Library website, call the reference desk at 607.438.5300, or stop by the Library during our regular hours.

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Can I access Library resources online?

Yes. You can search our library catalog and the Article Index at http://rakow.cmog.org/ from anywhere you have access to the Internet.

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Can I borrow books from the Library?

The Library’s primary collection is non-circulating, although we do loan some materials to other libraries through our Interlibrary Loan service. Please see the Library webpage for additional information about Interlibrary Loan.

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Can I use my laptop in the Library?

Yes. WiFi access to the Internet is available in our reading room.

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Can the library help with genealogical research?

At this time, the Library's archives include few glass company employee records. Our collections do not include personnel records for Corning Glass Works or Corning Incorporated. We encourage you to contact the Southeast Steuben County Library to gain a greater understanding of genealogical resources available for the Corning area.

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Does the Library have information about Corning Incorporated?

Our Library does have some information about Corning Incorporated. For more complete documentation concerning the company, you may contact the Corning Incorporated Archives at 607.974.8457.

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I would like to donate materials to the Rakow Research Library. Whom should I contact?

Please contact Lori Fuller at 607.438.5323 or librarydonations@cmog.org, for a further discussion of donating items.

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Is it open to the public? Do I need an appointment to use the Library?

The Library is free and open to the public from 9-5, Sunday-Saturday. You do not need an appointment to visit the Library. Please contact us at 607.438.5300 or rakow@cmog.org, if you would like to have preliminary research materials prepared in advance of your visit.

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What is available at the Library?

The Library contains the most comprehensive collection in the world on the subject of the art and history of glass and early glassmaking, stained glass, and techniques for glass artists.

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Where is the Library located?

The Library is located at 5 Museum Way, a short distance west of the Museum.
See #11 on the Museum campus map for details.

Membership

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Can a Member bring guests to member events?

Member events are for Museum Members only and not all Members are invited to all member events. Invitations to events depend on the membership level. Membership invitiations for CMoG events only allow two people on the event RSVP. We always invite you to purchase additional memberships as gifts for your friends and family so they can join you.

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Can I give a membership gift through my charitable trust, foundation, or donor-advised fund?

Yes, but giving through a charitable trust, foundation, or donor-advised fund carries certain restrictions. Please contact Member Services at membership@cmog.org or +1 (607) 438-5600 for more information.

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Can Members bring guests to the Museum?

Donor level Members can bring up to two guests for free per visit, Supporting level Members can bring four guests per visit, and Patron level Members can bring six guests per visit.

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Can my family members or friends use my membership card?

No, membership cards are not transferable; only the cardholder is entitled to use the card. Museum membership makes a great gift for family and friends, though. Visit the Membership section of our website for more information.

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Do Members need tickets for Member events?

All of our Member events require reservations. For your convenience, you can make reservations either by phone or email, +1 (607) 438-5600 or membership@cmog.org.

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Do Members receive a discount in the Museum Shops and Café?

Yes, Members receive a generous 15% discount off regularly-priced items in the Museum Shops and Cafe as well as special sales throughout the year. Please present your membership card when you check out.

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How can I update my membership information?

Contact Member Services at +1 (607) 438-5600 or membership@cmog.org.

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How can I upgrade my membership?

Upgrading your membership gives you access to additional benefits and opportunities and you can upgrade your current membership any time. Simply call Members Services at 607.438.5600 or visit the Membership section of our website, and select your new level. You can also upgrade when you receive your membership renewal notice. Simply mark the new level you desire to be at and return it in the pre-paid postage envelope with payment.

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How do I avoid the Admission line in the busy season?

The Admissions Lobby has a Members-only line for your convenience.

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How do I become a Member or renew my membership?

There are several ways to join, or to renew your membership. You may visit the Membership section of our website, call +1 (607) 438-5600, or mail your membership renewal form to: The Corning Museum of Glass, Member Services, One Museum Way, Corning, NY 14830. Memberships can be purchased or renewed at the Admissions Desk or in The Shops at the Museum.

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How many membership cards will I receive?

We issue up to two (adult) membership cards per household.

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What are the benefits of membership?

We offer a variety of benefits, ranging from complimentary admission each time you visit to invitations to private Members-ony events. A full list of benefits can be found inside the membership brochure or on the Membership section of our website.

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What does it mean to “waive” my benefits?

When you waive your benefits, you are choosing to have your gift be 100% tax deductible. You are not able to take advantage of any Member benefits.

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What is the Reciprocal Organization of Associated Museums (ROAM) Program and the North American Reciprocal Museum (NARM) Association?

Both the ROAM and NARM programs make it possible for members at one museum to enjoy the benefits of membership at another participating museum. Members of The Corning Museum of Glass at the Donor level and above will receive discounted or free admission at cultural institutions participating in these reciprocal membership programs upon presenting their specially-marked membership card.

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What should I do if I lose my membership card?

Please call Member Services at +1 (607) 438-5600 and we will send you a replacement membership card. Allow up to two weeks to receive your replacement membership card.

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When should I expect to receive my membership card?

Your membership cards will arrive approximately two weeks from the day your membership is processed.

Shops

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Can we ship merchandise we purchase at the Museum?

Yes! The Museum Shops will ship merchandise in special protective packaging anywhere in the continental U.S. Please inquire in The Shops for detailed information.

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What kinds of things are sold in the Museum Shops?

From beautiful original works of art by more than 200 artists to everyday items for the home, The Corning Museum of Glass Shops make up one of the largest museum shops anywhere.

Choose from a global selection of over 15,000 items including fine art, jewelry, accessories, holiday ornaments, and collectibles in every price range. You’ll also find housewares, locally-made art, and books, souvenirs and videos. In addition, the Museum is the exclusive producer and seller of Steuben Glass.

We ship anywhere in the world. Just ask any of our Retail Assistants. All proceeds from retail sales support the not-for-profit Corning Museum of Glass.

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Where can I buy Corningware?

Corningware and other World Kitchen brands are available in the Museum Shops Home Store and in the Corning-Revere Factory Store at 114 Pine Street in downtown Corning. You can get more information about the store at +1 (607) 962-1545.

Steuben

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Do you have someone who can appraise my Steuben glass?

Because of CMoG’s non-profit status, we are unable to appraise items (provide value estimates).

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How did The Corning Museum of Glass come to be the stewards of the Steuben brand?

CMoG is the perfect partner to steward the Steuben brand, and the ties between CMoG and Steuben are long and deep. Many of the most important Steuben creations are in the Museum’s collection, and the largest display of early Steuben glass in the world is on view at the Museum. In addition, CMoG’s Rakow Research Library holds many of Steuben’s archives, and in 2015 the original Steuben factory was transformed into the Museum’s new space for Hot Glass Demonstrations. Licensing Steuben exclusively to the Museum also underscores Corning Inc.’s commitment to supporting CMoG, since all proceeds from the sale of Steuben items go to the not-for-profit Museum.

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How did the legacy of Steuben begin?

Steuben is an American fine glass and crystal brand that makes the highest-quality decorative collectibles and luxury housewares. The company was founded in 1903 in Corning, New York – which is in Steuben County – and Corning Incorporated acquired the brand in 1918. Like their European counterparts, Steuben was originally focused on colored glass, but began producing iconic colorless pieces in 1933 using a new formula from Corning Inc. with a very high refraction index. These clear, modern creations, brought to life by the most talented artisans of each era, set the brand apart decade after decade. The brand remained in commercial production for over 100 years, representing the pinnacle of American craftsmanship and luxury.

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Is the new Steuben crafted with the same attention to detail?

The new Steuben is made in artisanal hotshops and by original Steuben suppliers, using the same exacting standards that made the brand synonymous with excellence.

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What is the history behind the new Steuben products being produced today?

In 2008, 105 years after it was founded, the Steuben division was sold by Corning Inc. to retail conglomerate Schottenstein Stores. When Schottenstein decided to end commercial production in 2011, Corning Inc. repurchased the brand, preserving this important aspect of America’s design heritage. A more detailed history of the brand is available on the Steuben.com Brand Timeline.

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What types of designs are offered?

The Museum Shops are offering select designs representing the full range of the Steuben brand, including art glass, collectibles, desk accessories, tabletop décor, stem and barware, and customizable pieces such as commemorative items and awards. Classic forms like hand coolers and animals are also available, alongside iconic designs from decades past as part of the Iconic Reintroductions series, as well as entirely new pieces from established Steuben designers. Steuben also offers signature collectibles to commemorate special occasions, including an annual Christmas ornament series. In addition, special commissions are also accepted and designs from a wide variety of categories can be personalized. Just look for the “Personalization” indicator in the item description online.

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Where can I buy new Steuben?

Corning Inc. has exclusively licensed the Corning Museum of Glass (CMoG) to sell new Steuben, and it is currently available through the Museum Shops, either online or at the Museum, through www.steuben.com, and at our authorized retailer George Watts & Son in Milwaukee, Wis. All proceeds from these sales benefit the not-for-profit Museum.

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Will more new and iconic designs be forthcoming?

Yes. Presenting new designs across categories is at the heart of the new Steuben line, and collectors can expect to see these offerings regularly. At the same time, Steuben is committed to introducing the next generation to the brand’s classic forms through the Iconic Reintroductions series, which will also be updated with additional designs from across the decades.

Hot Glass Demos

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At what temperature does glass begin to flow?

By definition, glass has a random arrangement of atoms. Upon cooling, these atoms are often locked into place before they can form regular and uniform bonds with their neighbors.
Because of randomness in bond strength, melting doesn’t occur at a specific temperature. Instead, it occurs over a range of temperatures, usually 1100° to 1400° F.

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Can glass be formed in nature?

Yes. Volcanic glass is called obsidian. Glass formed when a meteorite strikes sand is called a tektite. Glass formed from a lightning strike is called a fulgurite.

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Do glassblowers tend to develop respiratory problems?

Historically, it was not uncommon for glassmakers to suffer from a lung disease called silicosis. The raw materials used to make glass, especially silica, could accumulate in the lungs, severely reducing their ability to enrich blood with oxygen. The lungs are not able to absorb or expel silica, resulting in scarring and fibrosis. Today, workers protect themselves when working with raw materials by using a respirator. The act of blowing glass does not lead to respiratory problems.

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Do you have to blow hard to inflate glass?

To start the initial bubble, the glassmaker uses as much pressure as you would use to blow up a party balloon. Once started, the glass inflates very easily. As the glass cools, it continually stiffens, becoming harder and harder to inflate. Most items made at the Hot Glass Demos are “off-hand” formed without molds. Mold blowing often requires high pressures, sometimes glassblowers even use compressed air to fill out a complex mold.

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Do you shut the furnace off at night?

No, the furnace must remain on continually. It is filled with hundreds of pounds of glass, too much to heat up each day. It is also harmful for the refractory bricks to be repeatedly heated and cooled.

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Does glass continue to flow even at room temperature?

Glass does not flow once it reaches room temperature. The myth that glass flows over time has been perpetuated for years. You may have heard from your high school science teacher that the glass in an old stained glass window thickens at the bottom because it has “flowed down” over time. The glass in these windows is, in fact, often of varying thickness, but that is because of how the sheets of glass were made. There are many glass objects thousands of years older than those windows that show no sign of flow. Scientists at Corning Incorporated have conducted experiments simulating millions of years of gravity on glass and have proven that even on a geologic time %%scale%%, glass does not flow.

Learn more about this myth: Does Glass Flow? and A Common Misconception

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Does re-melting glass affect the quality?

Yes. When the same glass is melted many times, the quality deteriorates. This is noticeable to the gaffer as the glass becomes more “stiff” or difficult to tool. Clear glass from the Hot Glass Demos is always re-melted in addition to new batch, so no difference in quality is noticed.

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Does the Museum recycle glass?

Yes. Much of the clear glass scrap from the Hot Glass Demos is re-melted, however “crack-off” is not re-melted. Sometimes scraps of colored glass are used to make paperweights. Other glass waste is sent to a municipal recycling center.

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How are bubbles formed in the surface of glass?

Bubbles can be formed in glass when the batch is not melted properly or long enough, or when poor gathering techniques are used at the pipe. Bubbles can also be intentionally introduced into the surface of the glass by creating indentations and gathering over them.

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How can you use colored glass to decorate clear glass?

The Hot Glass Demo gaffers use colored glass in two forms: bar and frit. Color bars can be used to achieve solid colors, while frit (crushed up colored glass) is used for different mottled looks.

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How do we see into the furnace?

The camera behind the glory hole is protected by a sheet of fused silica glass and cooled with a stream of air. Fused silica is a high-temperature/low-expansion glass developed by Corning Glass Works (now Corning Incorporated) in 1930. It is made up only of chemically rendered silica and melts at 3800°F, or 2000°C, and can easily withstand the 2300°F heat of the furnace.

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How do you get the excess glass (moil) off the pipe once it cools?

The glass left over on the blowpipe will crack away in time. This is a result of the way the glass contracts as it cools.

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How does a glassmaker know how long to heat the glass?

Many factors tell the glassmaker how long to heat the glass. Glassblowers can see and feel the glass move on the end of the pipe. They watch the color of the glass and develop a sense of timing with practice.

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How does one learn to make glass?

Today, it is most common to learn glassmaking in an art program at a college or university. The focus at a university is typically on expressing oneself in glass and not on technique. Glassmaking can also be learned at public access workshops, or by apprenticing at established studios.

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How does the bubble appear without blowing?

Glassmakers often start the glassblowing process by the “blow and cap” method, wherein pressurized air is trapped in the pipe by the thumb. This air forms a bubble in the glass after a short delay. The delay is caused by a temperature differential in the glass. Near the pipe, the glass is cooled by the pipe head which is 1,000 degrees cooler than the glass. Some say the bubble is formed simply from the pressure of the initial breath, some say that air trapped in the blowpipe is heated by the hot glass and expands, forming the bubble. As gasses heat, they expand in accordance with “Charles’ Law.”

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How hot is the glass?

Hot Glass Demo glassblowers work the glass at 2100º F (1150º C).

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How is a reduction flame made?

Gaffers activate a small solenoid valve with a foot pedal, which introduces additional gas into the furnace’s flame.

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How is colored glass made?

Glass is colored by adding different metallic compounds to the batch (iron is added for green, cobalt is added to create cobalt blue, etc.).

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How long does it take to learn to make glass?

Generally, it takes about six years to become a professional glassmaker. There are many who are very capable with less experience, but they may lack versatility.

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How long does it take to melt the batch?

About 50 lbs of glass are melted for the Hot Glass Demos every day, which takes about eight hours to melt down and refine.

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How many BTUs is the furnace burner?

750,000 BTU on high fire.

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How many glass objects does The Corning Museum of Glass have?

The Museum has nearly 50,000 objects, representing every civilization and time period in which glass has been made.

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How many glass pieces does a glassblower make in a day?

In a production factory, it is not unusual for a team of three glassworkers to make 200+ items in one day. Some artisan studios make two to four complex pieces per day. Hot Glass Demo glassmakers usually make 12 to 15 items each day.

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How much gas does the Museum use?

A typical glass studio such as the Museum’s would use as much gas as approximately 10 homes.

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How often do the glassmakers get burned?

For professional glassmakers, it is uncommon to be burned in the studio. Burns that do happen, most often occur by touching hot metal and not glass. There are many hot surfaces and tools of which glassmakers must constantly be aware.

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In what temperature range do gaffers work glass?

The glass used in the Hot Glass Demos begins to soften around 1200º F or 650º C. Shaping on the pipe occurs in the 1500°–2100º F range, 800°–1150º C.

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Of what are the molds made?

Molds for glassblowing can be made of many materials. Early Roman ceramic and bronze molds for glass have been found. Today, most optic or pattern molds are made of bronze and aluminum, and most blow molds are made of wood or cast iron coated with cork.

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Of what is the marver made?

Marvers at the Museum are made of stainless steel. Marvers on the ship are made of bronze to protect against the corrosive sea air.

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Of what is the Museum’s furnace made?

The Museum’s furnace is made of several types of ceramic refractory brick. These bricks are more heat and corrosion resistant on the inner face, and more insulating on the outer surface.

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What are the benefits and drawbacks of lead glass?

Lead crystal has several desirable attributes, including a higher index of refraction (the way in which light reflects within the glass) and the fact that it is softer when cold,  allowing it to be more easily cut and engraved. Unlike soda lime glass, lead glass can also be brought to a high polish in a bath of acid.

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What fuels the furnace?

Natural gas. The Museum also has a furnace fueled with propane, and one that is electrically powered.

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What happens if you inhale on the blowpipe while you have hot glass at the end?

The glassmaker is not able to draw enough air out to the pipe to accidentally inhale hot air. Some glassmakers purposely collapse a bubble by inhaling to achieve certain designs.

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What happens to the glass I take to the recycling center?

Approximately 80% of the glass containers turned in for recycling are made into new containers. Each recycled container saves enough energy to run a 60-watt light bulb for four hours. There are also many secondary uses for recycled glass, including aggregate for concrete and blacktop, a melting agent used in forming bricks, for filtration, and as an abrasive.

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What is boron and why is it added?

An oxide of the element boron is used as a flux and gives glass its low thermal expansion. There’s actually a town named Boron, CA, where borax is mined.

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What is glass?

Glass is a state of matter that possesses the atomic structure of a liquid and the physical properties of a solid.

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What is limestone and why is it added?

Limestone, or calcium carbonate, is needed to stabilize glass and make it resistant to weathering.

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What is Pyrex or borosilicate glass?

Pyrex is the brand name of Corning Incorporated’s borosilicate glass. Borosilicate glass was developed in the late 19th century by the German glassmaker Otto Schott. Borosilicates have a composition of silica sand and boron. The biggest benefit of borosilicates is that they have very low thermal expansion, allowing them to heat and cool rapidly without breaking. Borosilicates must be shaped at higher temperatures than soda-lime glass.

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What is silica?

Silica is silicon dioxide, the compound that makes up quartz and sand. Silica is the most abundant mineral in the crust of the earth.

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What is soda ash and why is it added?

Soda ash, or sodium carbonate, is added to the glass as a “flux,” or an agent used to lower the melting temperature. Traditionally, sea plants were processed to yield soda ash. Today, soda is mined (in Wyoming) and refined into soda ash and baking soda.

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What is soda ash?

Also known as sodium carbonate, soda ash is derived from a sodium compound mined mostly in Wyoming. Traditionally, soda ash was derived from the ashes of sea plants.

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What is the difference between [lead] crystal and glass?

The term “crystal” originally referred to any high quality clear glass (a glass that resembles natural rock crystal). The Venetians first called their clear glass Cristallo in the 14th century. Today crystal most often refers to “lead crystal,” which uses lead as a flux in place of soda ash, giving the glass an incredibly clear appearance.

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What is the glass used in the Hot Glass Demos made of?

The Hot Glass Demo gaffers use a “soda-lime” glass, which has a basic composition of silica sand (70%), soda ash (20%), and limestone (10%).  This mixture is called a “batch.”

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What kind of safety gear does the Hot Glass Demo staff wear?

Glassblowers must wear safety glasses to protect against flying glass and harmful UV and IR radiation. It is also common for glassmakers to wear natural fibers and not synthetics, which %%melt%% when hot. Glassmakers sometimes wear gloves, but typically do not in order to retain dexterity and grip.

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What kinds of different molds are there?

Optic molds are used to give a bubble a pattern, which can be further inflated and formed out of the mold. Blow molds can be used to give an object its final form. Blow molds can be seamed for irregular shapes or turn molds for symmetrical forms with no seams.

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What kinds of wood are the blocks made of and why?

Glass shaping blocks are made of fruit woods: apple, cherry, and pear. These woods a have a dense and even grain, absorb water, and burn out evenly. For the first 10 to 15 seconds that a glassmaker uses the wood block, the glass rides on a layer of steam rather than burning the wood away.

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What makes glass iridize?

Ancient glass that has been buried over centuries often develops an iridescent surface. This is due to the interaction of elements in the base glass with the soil in which it was buried. Today, iridized surfaces can be produced using two methods: fuming and reducing. In fuming, the still hot glass is sprayed with metallic salts such as stannous chloride. In reducing, reactive gasses are applied to the surface of a piece, and the glass is then exposed to a reduction flame (gas rich) in the furnace.

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What’s that silver thing on the side of the furnace?

The furnace on the Hot Glass Demo stage has a heat recuperation system. This system pre-heats the combustion air to 500ºF by circulating it around the hot exhaust flue.

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What’s the most valuable piece of glass in the Museum?

It is impossible to say. The Museum is full of priceless treasures that exist nowhere else.

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Where does silica come from?

Silica is commonly mined throughout the Southern and Mid-Western United States.

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Where does The Corning Museum of Glass get colored glass?

Colored glass is purchased from a handful of companies that supply the art glass community with a full spectrum of colors. For the Hot Glass Demos, only clear glass is melted in the furnace, allowing the gaffers to apply color to the molten glass as needed.

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Which metals make which colors?

There are hundreds of metallic compounds and combinations of compounds that make color in glass, but here are some of the most common: cobalt = blue, iron  = green, copper = turquoise blue or ruby red, manganese = amethyst, gold = ruby or purple, cadmium = red, selenium = yellow, tin + antimony = white.

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Why are the pipes in the flame?

Glass will not stick to a cold blowpipe. The tips have to be heated to assure a proper, even start of the bubble.

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Why doesn’t the glass crack when shaped with a wet tool?

The water vaporizes too quickly at the interface with the glass. Molten glass will crack on the surface when submerged in water, but not when using the block.

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Why don’t the blocks steam when they touch the hot glass?

The steam is under the glass, when the block is lifted away, you can see the steam.

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Why don’t the blowpipes get hot where the glassmakers’ hands are?

Our blowpipes don’t get hot for a number of reasons. Mostly, the pipes are only briefly exposed to heat themselves when gathering. When re-heating, the glass is heated and not the pipe. Glass is an excellent insulator, and does not conduct heat into the pipe. Today, our pipes are made of stainless steel which also helps, since stainless is a poor conductor of heat. In addition, pipes are long enough that the glassmaker can always hold the pipe safely.

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Why is glass clear / transparent?

The simple answer is that it’s just the way it is. Like water, plastic and many other materials, glass transmits much of the light that strikes it. All glasses reflect about 8% of the light %%striking%% it. Darker glasses absorb more of the light. Colored glasses transmit all colors of the spectrum, except the color that the glass appears to be.

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Why is it called a glory hole?

While there is no concrete answer, there are several plausible origins of this term. In an old factory, where smoke and dust were everywhere, a 2100° opening would have created an illusion not unlike that seen in paintings of saints and angles where “The Glory” radiated from their heads. A break in the clouds where sunlight passes through is also called a glory hole. However, the term has more recently fallen out of use and the term “Reheating Furnace” is more widely used.

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Why is the glass sometimes thrown into water at the end of the demo?

The Hot Glass Demos are about teaching people about the process of glassmaking. The object is just a result of this learning experience. Recycling the objects made of clear glass helps the Museum save material, and is a memorable end to the demonstration.

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Why is the table called a “marver?”

Most believe that the word marver is derived from the French word for marble “marbre.” Traditionally, a stone surface would have been used to roll and shape the glass. Today, marvers are made of stainless steel because it is a poor conductor of heat.

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Why must glass be cooled slowly?

When glass is cooled too quickly below 950º F tremendous strain is created. Like many materials, glass expands as it heats and shrinks as it cools. When glass is allowed to cool quickly it cools unevenly, which in turn creates strain (not stress). Slow cooling forces the entire object to cool evenly, minimizing strain.

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Will the glassmakers sell me that piece after the demo?

The Museum does not sell any glass made during our demonstrations. The glass made in the Hot Glass Demos is given away during raffles, used for Museum events, and given to local charities. The Museum has established this practice to give our glassmakers more creative freedom, thus making our demos more interesting.