Micrographia, or, Some physiological descriptions of minute bodies made by magnifying glasses, with observations and inquiries thereupon / by R. Hooke, fellow of the Royal Society.

Title: 
Micrographia, or, Some physiological descriptions of minute bodies made by magnifying glasses, with observations and inquiries thereupon / by R. Hooke, fellow of the Royal Society.
Author/Artist: 
Hooke, Robert, 1635-1703.
Publisher: 
London : Printed by Jo. Martyn and Ja. Allestry, Printers to the Royal Society, and are to be sold at their Shop at the Bell in S. Paul's Church-yard., 1665.
Description: 
[36], 246, [10] p., [38] leaves of plates (copperplate, some some folded) ; 31 cm. (fol.)
Other Authors: 
Martyn, John, fl. 1649-1680, printer.
Allestry, James, d. 1670, printer.
Royal Society (Great Britain). Council.
Format of Material: 
Books
Bib ID: 
97628
Find this in the library
Location: 
Secured Stacks - Rare Books
Call Number: 
QH271.H78 1665 *
Location: 
Digital Book
Call Number: 
No call number available
Variant Title: 
Some physiological descriptions of minute bodies made by magnifying glasses
Notes: 
Title page in red and black.
Printer's device on title page with: "Nullius In Verba."
Epistole dedicatory to the King signed Robert Hook.
Includes an initial imprimatur leaf by the Council of the Royal Society of London, dated "Novem. 23. 1664."
Errata notes on p. [10], at end.
Includes printed marginal notes.
Plate i is bound in out of order at p. 20 instead of p. 1 and plate xvi at p. 163 instead of at p. 146.
Garrison-Morton (5th ed.), 262
Heirs of Hippocrates, 599
ESTC R18004
In English with Greek references.
Digitized by Boston Photo Imaging April 2013.
Contents: 
Observ. 6. Of glass-canes (p. 10) --
Observ. 7. Of glass drops (p. 33-44) --
Observ. 9. Of fantastical colours: The texture of Muscovy glass; its figures: what other bodies are like it (p. 48) --
... producing all kinds of colours with two flat plates of glass ... blowing glass so thin in the lamp, till it produce the same effect (p. 50-51) --
... what seems most likely to be the cause of colour : that propriety is indeavoured to be shewn in a glass ball ... (p. 62) --
... Whether this principle may not be made use of, for perfecting optick glasses? What might be hoped from it if it were to be done? (p. 233) --
... the longer the glasses are, and the bigger apertures they will indure, the more fit they are for these discoveries : that tis probable, longer glasses would yet make greater discoveries (p. 241).