The Corning Museum of Glass Supports Ten Artists-in-Residence in 2012

The Corning Museum of Glass Supports Ten Artists-in-Residence in 2012

March 16, 2012

Corning, NY – Ten artists will research and experiment with new techniques and subjects as 2012 Artists-in-Residence at The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass.

For one month, each artist will be supported with technical assistance, housing, a food stipend, and studio space. They also will have full access to The Studio’s state-of-the-art facilities, the Museum’s renowned Rakow Research Library, Museum staff, and the 45,000-object collection, which spans 35 centuries of glassmaking and represents each civilization in which glass has been made. 

“Our residency program enables artists to focus on exploring their creative ideas and expanding their technical repertoire without concerns outside The Studio,” says Amy Schwartz, director of The Studio.

The artists will provide public Lunchtime Lectures during their residencies, describing their artistic inspirations and their work at The Studio. Lectures will take place in The Studio Lecture Room at 12:00 p.m. on the specified dates. Registration is not required, and admission is free. Please contact (607) 438-5100 or thestudio@cmog.org for more details.

March - Mathieu Grodet

Grodet is a French-born artist living and working in Canada. He creates thin and elegant glass objects in classic Venetian style, engraved with imagery that addresses modern-day ideas and issues. Says Grodet, “Several themes are recurrent: a work on the memory, the inventories, but also on the lie (propaganda) or the secret.” His work “reflects a deep interrogation on the world and its violence, and shows a large capacity for subversion.” Grodet is represented by Galerie Elena Lee in Montreal, Quebec. His art has been shown at SOFA Chicago, Galerie Espace Verre, and others, and is held in several museum collections, including The Corning Museum of Glass (2010.4.54) and the Art Institute of Chicago. He has taught and demonstrated around the world. In his March 2012 Residency at The Studio, Grodet will use the Museum’s Rakow Library to research forms and styles for vessels, as well as sketches for his final drawings on the vessels.

Grodet will discuss his work at a free Lunchtime Lecture at The Studio, on March 22 at 12:00 p.m. Norwood Viviano, also a March Artist-in-Residence, will present at this Lunchtime Lecture as well.

March – Norwood Viviano

Viviano uses digital 3D modeling and printing technology in combination with the casting process to create his sculptural works. In 2001, Viviano was the recipient of the Emerging Artist Award from the Glass Art Society. He has held residencies at several museums and art schools, and his work has been shown at galleries throughout the United States, including the Heller Gallery in New York City. His art is represented in the collections of the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague; the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, WI; and the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, WA; and private collections. In his March 2012 Residency at The Studio, Viviano plans to create urban and/or industrial landscapes out of kiln-cast glass as an extension of previous installations. His work will “focus on smaller Midwestern industrialized cities that witnessed a huge population exodus during the second half of the 20th century, and West Coast and Southern cities that went through a transition of population growth, loss, and re-growth during the same period.

Viviano will discuss his work at a free Lunchtime Lecture at The Studio, on March 22 at 12:00 p.m. Mattheiu Grodet, also a March Artist-in-Residence, will present at this Lunchtime Lecture as well.

May – Ingalena Klenell

Swedish artist Klenell has been working with glass since 1976. Her work explores the ideas of fragility and vulnerability, both in the material of glass and in life itself. Klenell sees glass as a way of investigating the limits of techniques and of her own skill and creativity, and of creating ways to transcend those limits. She uses several different techniques to create primarily sculptural works. Klenell, who currently operates Edsbjorke Studio in Sweden with her husband, has been represented in exhibitions across Europe, and in the United States. In her May 2012 Residency at The Studio, Klenell will work on a project called Travelers. The project is based on the history of cultural exchange in trade relations between Venice and Egypt, inspired by a collection of glass shards found in Egypt that date from 1100 A.D. to 1400 A.D.

Klenell will discuss her work at a free Lunchtime Lecture at The Studio, on May 17 at 12:00 p.m. Marta Ramirez, also a May Artist-in-Residence, will present at this Lunchtime Lecture as well.

May – Marta Ramírez

Ramírez is a glass artist and industrial designer who teaches at the Los Andes University in Bogota, Colombia. Her work is clearly inspired by water, and she explores the similarities of this element and the material of glass through her art. “Water is movement, transparency, gravity, freefall. Water curls and zigzags” says Ramírez. “Glass does too.” In her May 2012 Residency at The Studio, Ramírez will interpret the works of Shinichi Maruyama, a Japanese artist and photographer who has developed an artistic body of work called Water Sculptures. These works use the camera to capture frozen images of moving water. In Ramírez’s residency, she will interpret the works of Maruyama, recreating the static moments of moving water.

Ramírez will discuss her work at a free Lunchtime Lecture at The Studio, on May 17 at 12:00 p.m. Ingalena Klenell, also a May Artist-in-Residence, will present at this Lunchtime Lecture as well.

September – Laura Donefer & Jeff Mack
Collaborative Instructor Residency

Laure Donefer is an established Canadian artist best known for her colorful mixed media work. Donefer has taught around the world and many of her trademark classes involve pushing the boundaries of glassmaking. Her work is exhibited internationally and is held in many public and private collections, including The Corning Museum of Glass. Jeff Mack’s work references more traditional techniques. He has been the manager of the Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art, as well as a glassblower and instructor at Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village. His work is held in both public and private collections worldwide. In their September 2012 Instructor Collaborative Residency at The Studio, Donefer and Mack will imitate classic vessels in the Museum’s collection, adding crazy “Doneferian” twists, loading them with texture.

No lecture.

September - Anna Boothe & Nancy Cohen
Collaborative Instructor Residency

Anna Boothe has worked with glass since 1980. She holds an M.F.A. from the Tyler School of Art, where she was a member of the Glass Program faculty for 16 years. Boothe lectures and teaches glassmaking around the world. Her work is in the collection of The Corning Museum of Glass. Booth kiln casts glass, into which she often incorporates fabricated metal and found objects. Her recent work combines literally representative cast-glass forms that are made into sculpture or woven into flat, rug-like structures. Her art addresses issues of balance, compassion, internal vs. external, and communication. Nancy Cohen’s works are comprised of many mediums: handmade paper, found objects, resin and, for the past 10 years, glass. She chooses a basic form and, using it repetitively, transforms the object into rays of morphed forms that crawl across the surface of a wall.

In their September 2012 Instructor Collaborative Residency at The Studio, Boothe will work with Cohen to create a floor or wall installation piece inspired by an historical textile. Both artists will translate symbols into three-dimensional forms to create a visual reinterpretation of the tapestry.

No Lecture.

October - Joanna Manousis

Joanna Manousis holds an M.F.A. in Sculpture from Alfred University, NY, and a B.F.A. in Glass from The University of Wolverhampton, England. She has worked, studied, and taught in Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States, and has received a number of scholarships and awards for her blown and kiln-cast sculpture. Currently, Manousis resides in the United States, and is teaching as an adjunct for a year at Alfred University. Her work captures and animates transitional moments, revealing a world in which objects, being, and places are interconnected and in flux. She uses glass to induce reflection—both physically and metaphorically. In her October 2012 Residency at The Studio, Manousis is interested in working on a new body of work that alludes to both nature and to man-made artifice, creating a series of blown molded forms in clear glass that have thin layers of pâte de verre strategically inlaid into the blown surfaces.

Manousis will discuss her work at a free Lunchtime Lecture at The Studio, on October 25 at 12:00 p.m.

November – Andrew Erdos

Erdos’ work is pop, sarcastic, and humorous, with a hint of social commentary. He says, “I like taking objects that we are comfortable with—like a human’s reaction to animals—and exploring how we interact with them. In my work, there is a complex series of relationships happening; I am trying to explore all the possible caveats of an idea.” Erdos incorporates sculpture, video, performance, and sound to explore the current clash at the intersection of culture, technology, and nature. In his November 2012 Residency at The Studio, Erdos will be creating work for his upcoming solo exhibition at the Claire Oliver Gallery in New York City. He will continue working on his series of mirrored, blown glass animals combined with new media elements.

Erdos will discuss his work at a free Lunchtime Lecture at The Studio, on November 27 at 12:00 p.m. Charles Stern, also a November Artist-in-Residence, will present at this Lunchtime Lecture as well.

November – Charles Stern

Charles Stern’s work references the decline of glass manufacture in western nations. He uses digital technology to “problematise the role of hand craft in the post-industrial environment.” In 2011, Stern participated in a project at the Glass Factory in Smaland, Sweden. His work, entitled World of No Craft, involved making a selection of about 100 pieces that he used to create digital models and animations showing objects morphing from one shape to another. In his November 2012 Residency at The Studio, Stern will create an interactive installation that acts as a link between the applied knowledge involved in glassblowing and a museum archive.

Stern will discuss his work at a free Lunchtime Lecture at The Studio, on November 27 at 12:00 p.m. Andrew Erdos, also a November Artist-in-Residence, will present at this Lunchtime Lecture as well.

About The Corning Museum of Glass

The Corning Museum of Glass is home to the world’s most important collection of glass, including the finest examples of glassmaking spanning 3,500 years. Live glassblowing demonstrations (offered at the Museum, on the road, and at sea on Celebrity Cruises) bring the material to life. Daily Make Your Own Glass experiences at the Museum enable visitors to create work in a state-of-the-art glassmaking studio. The campus in Corning includes a year-round glassmaking school, The Studio, and the Rakow Research Library, the world’s preeminent collection of materials on the art and history of glass. Located in the heart of the Finger Lakes Wine Country of New York State, the Museum is open daily, year-round. Kids and teens, 19 and under, receive free admission. www.cmog.org.

The Museum is currently adding a North Wing, designed by Thomas Phifer, which will open March 20, 2015. The 100,000-square-foot North Wing addition will include a new 26,000-square-foot contemporary art gallery building, as well as one of the world’s largest facilities for glassblowing demonstrations and live glass design sessions.