The American Cut Glass Industry: T. G. Hawkes and His Competitors

This book presents information about the late 19th- and early 20th-century cut glass industry, both in Corning, New York, and elsewhere in the United States. The primary focus is on T.G. Hawkes and Company of Corning, one of the nation's largest makers of glass at the turn of the century, because of the recent discovery of Hawkes' archival materials from the 1880s and 1890s. Among these materials are thousands of letters from customers, suppliers, and tradespeople. The letters shed new light on business conditions and labor practices as well as products of the late 19th century.

Jane Shadel Spillman, the Museum’s curator of American glass, has produced a book that examines the workings of the industry itself, including labor relations, sources of blanks, special orders for the White House, Hawkes's representation at the Paris world's fair in 1889, and communication between the cut glass industry and silver manufacturers such as Gorham and Tiffany. Competition and cooperation between the glass cutting firms are also highlighted, and considerable attention is paid to other companies, such as J. Hoare, H. P. Sinclaire, and O. F. Egginton.

Published by Antique Collectors’ Club in association with The Corning Museum of Glass.

Pages: 
350 pages with more than 500 illustrations
Author: 
Jane Shadel Spillman
The American Cut Glass Industry: T. G. Hawkes and His Competitors