All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper  with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Librarian at our Rakow Research Library.

Documented Use of Cup Plates in the Nineteenth Century
Article

Cup plates are an example of the specialized items in ceramics and glass with which Victorian ladies liked to clutter dinner and tea tables. Later in the century, these small plates were joined by a host of other "special" items: ice cream sets, berry sets, lemonade sets, and dishes for

Glass for the King of Siam: Bernard Perrot’s Portrait Plaque of King Louis XIV and Its Trip to Asia
Article

In 2004, The Corning Museum of Glass acquired an oval cast glass plaque with the portrait of King Louis XIV (Fig. 1) of France (r. 1643–1715). It is the second plaque of its kind in the museum, and one of eight examples that are known (3 in the catalog below). This plaque was not purchased so that

A Passion Bottle by Alexandre Soudart
Article

Since 1977, the collections of The Corning Museum of Glass have included a rather curious object. 1 It is a tall, footed, cylindrical bottle of colorless glass, in which float numerous small lampworked figures suspended from buoyant glass bubbles (Fig. 1). The top of the bottle is sealed, forming a

The Glastenbury Glass Factory Company
Article

Presented here is a report of the excavation of the Glastenbury Glass Factory Company site in conjunction with the documentary evidence on the production and operations of this factory. This excavation, prompted by the imminent eradication of the site by the relocation of Connecticut Route 2 the

Glasses with American Views – Addenda
Article

In 1977, the author discussed two groups of glasses engraved with American views, probably made in the United States but possibly abroad. 1 In the last two years, several more glasses in each of these groups have been discovered, along with some new information which is here presented. Five

Glasses with American Views
Article

Glasses engraved with scenic views or important buildings are part of a Germanic tradition dating to the eighteenth century. Similar commemorative glasses are noted in England, e.g., the well-known Sunderland Bridge rummers, but they are less common in English glass. Germanic glasses with this type

Enameled Glass Vessels, 1425 B.C.E.–1800: The Decorating Process
Article

The earliest glass vessel decorated with enameling dates from about 1425 B.C.E. 1 It successfully combines one of humankind’s oldest creative urges (the desire to draw on things) with one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world (glassmaking). Today, essentially the same process

Chemical Analyses of Amelung Glasses
Article

Introduction Chemical analyses and laboratory studies of glasses from the ancient and medieval worlds have provided a great deal of useful information for archaeologists, curators, and historians, 1 but until now, few such studies have been carried out on glasses from more recent periods. One

Mythological Beakers: A Re-examination
Article

In 1972, Gladys Davidson Weinberg published a study of 24 vessels and fragments of a type of first-century A.D. mold-blown glass known as a mythological beaker. 1 While subsequent publications have included individual beakers and fragments, they have not been surveyed again as a group, 2 and they

An Unusual Fragment of Cameo Glass
Article

The subject of this note is a fragment of cameo glass [59.1.509] (Figs. 1 and 2), now in The Corning Museum of Glass, that was formerly in the collection of Ray Winfield Smith. 1 It was shown in the 1957 exhibition Glass from the Ancient World as part of a group of early Islamic cameo glass,

East Meets West: Cross-Cultural Influences in Glassmaking in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Article

Beginning in the 13th century, the philosophies, scientific discoveries, and artistic achievements of East Asia gradually became known in Europe. The Chinese began large-scale international trade during the Southern Song dynasty (1127–1279), exchanging goods with Western merchant travelers. 1 The

The Seasons Vase
Article

The "Vase des Saisons" is the name given by Jean de Foville to a cameo glass bottle in the Cabinet des Medailles et Antiques of the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris. (Figs. A, B, C "Alabastron en verre camée" (Camée.623)). The object may be described as follows: H. (as restored) 16