All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper  with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Librarian at our Rakow Research Library.

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Exciting... new Cinderella bowl set by Pyrex [advertisement].
Library

Corning Glass Works. 141130 1 page: color; 34 x 14 cm paper ink print single sided Advertisement features central image of four bowls, in varying sizes, in turquoise and white with butter-print pattern. Two bowls are in turquoise on white and two in white on turquoise. Some text featured as well.

Just in time for Christmas giving... [advertisement]: new Pyrex ware decorator casseroles!
Library

Corning Glass Works. 141137 New Pyrex ware decorator casseroles! 1 page: color; 34 x 15 cm paper ink print single sided Advertisement features images of various Pyrex casseroles that seem to float above pine bough candle holder. Casseroles include: turquoise snowflake pattern on white casserole;

Mother's Day gifts... for June brides, too! [advertisement]: give time-saving Pyrex ware!
Library

Corning Glass Works. [Ladies' home journal 1956] 98287 [S.l.: s.n., 1956]. [1] p.: col. ill.; 36 x 26 cm. Unit 7, Drawer 7 Advertisement for Pyrex ware including color bowl set, oven-refrigerator-freezer set, teapot, double boiler, percolator, casserole, mixing bowl set, and dinnerware.

Now--from the makers of Pyrex ware... Desert Dawn [advertisement].
Library

Corning Glass Works. [Life] [August 1, 1955] 98313 1 page: color; 36 x 27 cm paper ink print single sided Unit 7, Drawer 7 Advertisement features image along left edge of cactus with desert dawn in background. Featured on lower right portion of advertisement are various pieces of baking ware in

Now it's Pyrex dinnerware! [advertisement]: never before, dishes so smart, so beautiful with such amazing strength!
Library

Corning Glass Works. [Life] [1953] 141168 2 pages: color; 36 x 27 cm each paper ink print single sided Advertisement, on two page spread, features dinner table set for four in Flamingo pattern with 22-carat gold bands. Below, on lower right, are images for all four "high-style colors":

Pyrex bakingware in color [advertisement].
Library

Corning Glass Works. 141103 1 page: color; 36 x 26 cm paper ink print single sided Advertisement features central image of hand lifting lid off flamingo colored covered bowl casserole dish. Image is captioned "Perfect colors for your table". Smaller image, on lower left corner, is of lime

Behind the Glass Lecture: Ayala Serfaty
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Israeli designer Ayala Serfaty talks about her sculpture "Soma 2015," on view now at the Museum. https://www.cmog.org/artwork/soma-2015 Serfaty’s Soma series is both functional lighting and conceptual sculpture, inspired by landscape formations. Serfaty worked for six years to develop the

Instructor Highlight at The Studio: Richard Whiteley
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"One of my big motivations for teaching is to share the information that I have and learn from other people working in the medium of cast glass. I think it’s a very exciting medium for contemporary art and I’d love to see more work done in this area" says Richard Whiteley. https://www

Instructor Highlight at The Studio: Silvia Levenson
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“My role when I am teaching is to just push people to make. For being a good dancer, you don’t need to know a lot about technique – you have to stand up and dance,” says Silvia Levenson. https://www.cmog.org/bio/silvia-levenson Levenson believes her work is an expression of her soul. She uses glass

Live-Streamed Studio Demo: James Mongrain (Sept 2, 2015)
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Watch as James Mongrain demonstrates for his class, Goblets: Form and Function, which focused on developing contemporary form and function while exploring the Venetian tradition of glassmaking. See a photo of the finished pieces on the event listing on our website http://www.cmog.org/event/live

Carl Siglin: Museum Gaffer
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Carl Siglin began blowing glass in 2003 when he was hired as a technician at The Studio. Prior to his work in glass, Carl, who attended Syracuse University's School of Architecture, ran his...

The Window Machines: Sheet & Plate Glass
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The mighty glowing columns that stand like pillars in a ghostly cathedral...     -Anonymous At the beginning of the 20th century, there was no way to mass-produce flat glass. Although glass cylinders could be drawn by machine, they had to be opened and flattened by hand. What was needed was a way

On a Pool of Tin: Float Glass
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The auto and building industries boomed after World War II. Plate glass was in extremely short supply. Twin-grinding—used all over the world to make the glass—was too costly and too slow to keep up with the demand. Could high-quality glass be made without grinding and polishing? Alastair Pilkington

Magnificent House Altar from 1500s Restored
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On August 2, 2007, a beautiful, fully restored 16th-century German house altar (59.3.39) was put on display for the first time since its acquisition by The Corning Museum of Glass in 1959. The altar is 49.6 cm tall, and contains seven reverse-painted glass panels. These depict scenes of the

Jobs in a 19th-Century Glass Factory
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In a typical glass factory in earlier times, most workers would work as unskilled laborers. An unskilled laborer was usually called "boy," a term which did not refer to the age of the individual. Although girls were known to perform other work, they often worked as inspectors and packers

Pietro Bigaglia
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One of the most noteworthy contributors to the development of the first paperweight was the 19th century Venetian glassmaker Pietro Bigaglia. Bigaglia’s family owned glassmaking shops in Venice as early as 1674. He made mirrors as well as lamps and window panes decorated with filigree and

Perfume Bottles: From Design Table to Dressing Table
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Since ancient times, perfume bottles have served to contain the most subtle of mysteries: delightful, seductive scents. Before glassblowing, ancient Egyptian artisans fashioned exquisite containers from alabaster, metals, precious stones, and core-formed glass to hold their highly valued perfumes.

One Step Closer: The Iron Glassblower
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A little more than 2,000 years ago, a Roman glassworker did something that dramatically changed the course of history. He blew a puff of air through a hollow %%rod%% into a gob of hot glass. The gob inflated into a bubble. At that moment, glassblowing was born. Glassblowing provided a way to make

Founders of American Studio Glass: Dominick Labino
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At the time that [studio glassworking] began, not one of us involved was aware of the speed with which it would spread. Not only nationally, but internationally. — Dominick Labino, undated manuscript Dominick Labino’s contributions to 20th-century glassmaking were wide-ranging and innovative.

A Pressing Solution: Shaped Glass
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Glass manufacturers had spent centuries learning how to make flat glass. Now, they wanted to bend it into complex shapes—without marring its surface. Anything that touched the surface of the hot glass could leave a mark. The first curved windows were made by slumping. A glass sheet was placed in a

Meet the Artist: April Surgent
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April Surgent rethinks engraving and cameo techniques, reaching back to antiquity to create works that look painterly, photographic, and contemporary. Her images come to light through precise cutting and the grinding away of fused glass layers, usually milky white on the top with darker strata

Czech Glass vs. Bohemian Glass
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Do you know the difference between the Czech Republic and Bohemia? The short answer is that there is practically none. Both names refer to nearly the same region, and they are used for historical reasons. From the Middle Ages to 1918, Bohemia was the name of what is today the major part of the

Beyond Venice: Glass in Venetian Style, 1500-1750
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In Renaissance Europe, the compulsion to copy Venetian glassmaking styles and techniques was no simple fashion fad. The glass was clearly superior in almost every way. The glass was called “cristallo” because it was clear and colorless, a quality the Venetians achieved as early as 1440 by making it

Genie in the Bottle: Glass Bulbs & TV Tubes
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In 1879, the brilliant inventor Thomas Edison was on the verge of a breakthrough. He had discovered a slow-burning filament that would glow for hours in the vacuum of a glass globe. But to create the first practical electric light, he needed a glass globe that would not implode when the air was

Solarized Glass
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Certain types of colorless, transparent glasses, when exposed to sunlight for extended periods of time, develop a pink or pale purplish color. Bottles, insulators, and other objects having their color changed in this way are often called "desert glass," but the scientist prefers the term

Lighting the Way: Fresnel Lens
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The most dangerous part of a sailing trip used to be returning to shore. Lighthouses were built to signal the safest route, but often the weak light from their lamps was not visible until too late. The large, thick lens that was supposed to project the light absorbed much of the signal.  Hollowing

Louis Comfort Tiffany Paperweights
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Louis Comfort Tiffany, the son of Charles Lewis Tiffany, was born in 1848. At the time of Tiffany’s birth his father owned one of the most prestigious jewelry and silver stores in America. Tiffany grew up around the decorative arts and decided to become a painter in 1866 rather than attend

Drawings for American Stained Glass
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Drawings for American %%Stained Glass%%, a 2010 exhibition at the Museum’s Rakow Research Library, showcased 19th- and 20th-century designs from studios and artists across the United States. These designs illustrated the great diversity in style and subject matter in modern American stained glass,

19th Century French Paperweight Makers
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Compagnie des Cristalleries de Saint-Louis Compagnie des Cristalleries de Saint-Louis, which is named after the sainted King Louis IX, was founded in Lorraine, France in 1767 and still exists today. Along with Baccarat, it nearly monopolized the French luxury glass industry for many years. In late

A Trip Up a Goat Path Unearths Blaschka-Era Lampworking Table
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Who would have thought that a trip up a goat path would lead to the Museum’s acquisition of a 19th-century lampworking table that was part of the 2007 Botanical Wonders exhibition? In October 2006, Steve Gibbs, the Museum’s manager of events marketing, embarked on a mission to find a lampworking

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