All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper  with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Librarian at our Rakow Research Library.

Pages

Studio Demonstrations: Heather Trimlett
Video

Watch Heather Trimlett demonstrate for her Beadmaking with an Introduction to Glass Buttons class at The Studio. Students of this class will learn to work smarter and more efficiently in order to gain the maximum return on torch time. The class will take the mystery out of clear casing, stringer

Studio Demonstrations: Mark Matthews
Video

Watch Mark Matthews demonstrate for his Graphic and Color Systems in Glass class at The Studio. This class will use colored rods, powders, frits, and techniques such as color overlaying and cane making, students will create combinations of graphic patterns and will experiment with color schemes.

Studio Demonstrations: Alex Brand
Video

Watch Alex Brand demonstrate for his Color Working Techniques course at The Studio. This course will present various color working techniques and teach students to infuse their glassmaking with color. The class will focus on various types of incalmo work; the hot joining of two or more separate

2300°: Salsa (December 20, 2012)
Video

The Corning Museum of Glass presents its popular 2300° series of art happenings each year, featuring live music, hot glassmaking, and great food and drink. This video gives you an inside look at the festivities at 2300°: Salsa (December 20, 2012), including music by El Rumbon, glassmaking by Pablo

Lalique lights and decorations / designed by Réné Lalique.
Library

Breves Lalique Galleries, London, England. René Lalique et cie. 132556 Lalique lighting Lalique lights London: Breves Lalique Galleries, [ca. 1930s] (London & Banbury: Henry Stone & Son, Ltd.) 20 p.: ill. (some col.); 25 cm. Breves Lalique Galleries "Light catalogue index" (with

Glass in the Price Edict of Diocletian
Article

In A.D. 301, Emperor Diocletian attempted to halt a rapid rise in prices by issuing his Edictum de pretiis (Edict on prices), which established maximum prices and wages throughout the Roman Empire. Copies of the edict were inscribed in Latin or Greek on marble panels and posted in prominent places.

Glass in the Epigrams of Martial
Article

The Verses of Martial, which were composed between A.D. 83 and 102, mostly in Rome, contain 12 explicit references to objects made of glass (for which Martial uses the noun vitrium or the adjective vitreus), together with two references to "Vatinian cups" (calices Vatinii), which appear

East Meets West: Cross-Cultural Influences in Glassmaking in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Article

Beginning in the 13th century, the philosophies, scientific discoveries, and artistic achievements of East Asia gradually became known in Europe. The Chinese began large-scale international trade during the Southern Song dynasty (1127–1279), exchanging goods with Western merchant travelers. 1 The

The Estonian Glasshouse of Hüti, 1628–1664
Article

Before his death, Maks Roosma, Professor in the Department of Glass, State Art Institute, Tallinn, Estonia, sent a brief article summarizing the results of his research into the history of the most important early glasshouse in Estonia. Professor Roosma had conducted an archaeological excavation on

Depictions of Glassmaking in Diderot’s Encyclopédie
Article

Denis Diderot and Jean Le Rond d’Alembert published their much acclaimed Encyclopédie in Paris from 1751 to 1765. To illustrate their entries, they commissioned several hundred engraved images depicting artistic crafts and common trades in preindustrial France. Since pictorial representations of

A Recently Discovered Cage Cup
Article

This paper describes and discusses a late Roman cage cup that appeared on the market in 1986 and was acquired by The Corning Museum of Glass in 1987. 1 The hemispherical glass cup has metal fittings which indicate that, at the time of burial, it was meant to be suspended. This raises the

Byzantine Silver Stain: Another Example?
Article

In last year's Journal of Glass Studies [Vol. 42], Mark T. Wypyski and the present authors described a fragmentary vessel decorated with silver stain, and concluded that it is Byzantine and of about the 10th century. 1 We compared the fragment with the celebrated bowl with painted ornament in

Roman Glass Boats
Article

This note discusses the function of a group of Roman glass models of boats. Six boats are known. They were found at Pompeii (two examples, including Fig. 1), 1 Palombara in Sabina, 2 Aquileia 3 and Santa Elena di Melma near Treviso in ltaly, 4 and St. Aldegund near Koblenz in Germany. 5 All of the

The Transition from Natron to Plant Ash in the Levant
Article

The basic components of early glasses were soda, lime, and silica. In the Mediterranean region and Western Asia, these three components were usually introduced in the form of two ingredients: either natron (soda) and sand containing shell fragments (silica and lime), or ash derived from halophytic

The Date of the Glass from Karanis
Article

Today, more than 60 years after its publication, Donald B. Harden's monograph on the glass from Karanis 1 is still one of the most frequently cited sources of information on the glass of Roman Egypt. The quantity of objects found at the site and their excellent state of preservation provided

Masters of Studio Glass: Richard Marquis
Article

Richard Marquis, a self-described glassblower and collector of beat-up, vintage objects, has had an extraordinary influence on the development of contemporary studio glass in America and around the world. As an artist, he is admired for his understanding of color and form as well as for his humor

A Conversation Between Liza Lou, Contemporary Sculptor and Installation Artist and Tina Oldknow, Curator of Modern Glass
Article

Tina Oldknow: I thought we would begin our conversation by discussing one sculpture in particular: Continuous Mile. How did the idea for this work come about? Liza Lou: Continuous Mile is a meditation on process. It’s a project that is spread across seven different townships in KwaZulu-Natal. The

The Coleman system.
Library

Hydro Carbon Co., Toledo, OH, USA. 133124 Gasoline lighting perfected by the Coleman system. Toledo, Ohio: Hydro Carbon Co., [ca. 1890-1900] 110, [1] p.: ill.; 22 cm. Hydro Carbon Co. Digitized by Boston Photo Imaging April 2013. Purchase; Denning House Antiquarian Book & Manuscripts; 2013;

Bees and Butterflies: Two Drawings by Harry Clarke
Article

In March 1996, the Rakow Library of The Corning Museum of Glass acquired two important drawings by the early 20th-century Irish stained glass artist Harry Clarke 1 (1889–1931). One of these drawings, created in 1914, is a detailed design for Clarke's "St. Gobnet" window in the Honan

Weathered Archaeological Glass
Article

Glass is found at archaeological excavations in a variety of conditions. The glass condition can range from pristine, where no deterioration is visible, to so heavily degraded that practically all the glass has been transformed into corrosion products. The deterioration of the glass surface is

René Lalique: Design Drawings for a Perfume Pendant and a Perfume Bottle
Article

Thanks largely to René Lalique (1860–1945), glass became one of the liveliest forms of expression in French decorative arts during the first half of the 20th century. In the vanguard of both the Art Nouveau and Art Deco movements, Lalique helped to reinvigorate the market for French luxury goods.

Early Modern Printed Books at the Rakow Library, 1450-1550: An Introduction
Article

A select group of rare books in the Rakow Research Library’s collection serve not only as repositories of early glass knowledge but also as artifacts of fine bookmaking. They were written by ancient authors and printed some 1,000 years later during the first century of modern printing (about 1450

Marcus Vitruvius Pollio's De architectura (On architecture) printed in Rome, 1486
Article

In the canon of architectural writings, this ancient Roman Latin text stands at the summit. It was written by Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (fl. first century B.C.) sometime in the late first century B.C. Today’s architecture students find it on their reading lists, and it is still available in paperback

Strabo's De situ orbis printed in Venice, 1472
Article

When Johannes de Spira died in 1470, the printing business he had started was taken over by his brother, Vindelinus. Two years later, Vindelinus published Strabo’s De situ orbis, an ancient geographical text consisting of 17 books. A first edition of this work had been issued in Rome in 1469 by

Aristophanes' Nine Comedies and Aristotle's Works printed in Greek by Aldus Manutius in Venice, 1498
Article

One of the most learned scholar-printers in Venice was Aldus Manutius (1449–1515). He designed a Greek type font that, beginning about 1495, he used to print a series of texts by the ancient Greek masters. The Rakow Research Library has two of these original Aldine editions in its collection. One

Dio Cassius' Roman History printed by Robert Estienne in Paris, 1548
Article

One might say that the 16 th century scholar-printer Robert Estienne (1503-1559) inherited from Aldus Manutius the mantle of Greek printing. At the very least, he must have felt an affinity with Aldus based on his love for the ancient Greek writings and his desire to render them in modern

Flavius Josephus’ books on Jewish history printed by Johann Schüssler in Augsburg, 1470
Article

One of the most reliable sources of ancient Jewish history is Flavius Josephus (about 37–97 A.D.), a native of Jerusalem and a learned statesman who became a favorite of Roman emperors. His two chief works, De bello Judaico (The Jewish war) and De antiquitate Judaica (Jewish antiquities), are bound

Isaac Newton, Opticks: Or, a Treatise of the Reflexions, Refractions, Inflexions and Colours of Light, 1704
Article

Isaac Newton (1642–1727) is often described as the greatest of all scientific thinkers. He is most famous, perhaps, for having formulated the universal law of gravitation, as well as the laws of motion. However, his interests also included alchemy, theology, mathematics, and the branch of physics

Udagawa Yoan and William Henry, Seimi Kaiso: A Japanese chemistry text in seven volumes, published in Edo (Tokyo), 1837
Article

Seimi Kaiso plays an important role in the remarkable story of Western scientific influences in Japan. When this work first appeared in 1837, Japan had been almost completely isolated from the larger world for two centuries. The Japanese were not allowed to travel abroad, and only the Chinese and

Vannoccio Biringuccio, De la pirotechnia, 1540
Article

The technology of printing with movable type, which had been invented in the mid-15th century, was still in its youth when Vannoccio Biringuccio’s comprehensive work on metallurgy, De la pirotechnia, was published in Venice in 1540. The phenomenon of the printed book spread knowledge and encouraged

Pages