All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper  with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Librarian at our Rakow Research Library.

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Byzantine Silver Stain: Another Example?
Article

In last year's Journal of Glass Studies [Vol. 42], Mark T. Wypyski and the present authors described a fragmentary vessel decorated with silver stain, and concluded that it is Byzantine and of about the 10th century. 1 We compared the fragment with the celebrated bowl with painted ornament in

Roman Glass Boats
Article

This note discusses the function of a group of Roman glass models of boats. Six boats are known. They were found at Pompeii (two examples, including Fig. 1), 1 Palombara in Sabina, 2 Aquileia 3 and Santa Elena di Melma near Treviso in ltaly, 4 and St. Aldegund near Koblenz in Germany. 5 All of the

The Transition from Natron to Plant Ash in the Levant
Article

The basic components of early glasses were soda, lime, and silica. In the Mediterranean region and Western Asia, these three components were usually introduced in the form of two ingredients: either natron (soda) and sand containing shell fragments (silica and lime), or ash derived from halophytic

The Date of the Glass from Karanis
Article

Today, more than 60 years after its publication, Donald B. Harden's monograph on the glass from Karanis 1 is still one of the most frequently cited sources of information on the glass of Roman Egypt. The quantity of objects found at the site and their excellent state of preservation provided

Masters of Studio Glass: Richard Marquis
Article

Richard Marquis, a self-described glassblower and collector of beat-up, vintage objects, has had an extraordinary influence on the development of contemporary studio glass in America and around the world. As an artist, he is admired for his understanding of color and form as well as for his humor

A Conversation Between Liza Lou, Contemporary Sculptor and Installation Artist and Tina Oldknow, Curator of Modern Glass
Article

Tina Oldknow: I thought we would begin our conversation by discussing one sculpture in particular: Continuous Mile. How did the idea for this work come about? Liza Lou: Continuous Mile is a meditation on process. It’s a project that is spread across seven different townships in KwaZulu-Natal. The

The Coleman system.
Library

Hydro Carbon Co., Toledo, OH, USA. 133124 Gasoline lighting perfected by the Coleman system. Toledo, Ohio: Hydro Carbon Co., [ca. 1890-1900] 110, [1] p.: ill.; 22 cm. Hydro Carbon Co. Digitized by Boston Photo Imaging April 2013. Purchase; Denning House Antiquarian Book & Manuscripts; 2013;

Bees and Butterflies: Two Drawings by Harry Clarke
Article

In March 1996, the Rakow Library of The Corning Museum of Glass acquired two important drawings by the early 20th-century Irish stained glass artist Harry Clarke 1 (1889–1931). One of these drawings, created in 1914, is a detailed design for Clarke's "St. Gobnet" window in the Honan

Weathered Archaeological Glass
Article

Glass is found at archaeological excavations in a variety of conditions. The glass condition can range from pristine, where no deterioration is visible, to so heavily degraded that practically all the glass has been transformed into corrosion products. The deterioration of the glass surface is

René Lalique: Design Drawings for a Perfume Pendant and a Perfume Bottle
Article

Thanks largely to René Lalique (1860–1945), glass became one of the liveliest forms of expression in French decorative arts during the first half of the 20th century. In the vanguard of both the Art Nouveau and Art Deco movements, Lalique helped to reinvigorate the market for French luxury goods.

Early Modern Printed Books at the Rakow Library, 1450-1550: An Introduction
Article

A select group of rare books in the Rakow Research Library’s collection serve not only as repositories of early glass knowledge but also as artifacts of fine bookmaking. They were written by ancient authors and printed some 1,000 years later during the first century of modern printing (about 1450

Marcus Vitruvius Pollio's De architectura (On architecture) printed in Rome, 1486
Article

In the canon of architectural writings, this ancient Roman Latin text stands at the summit. It was written by Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (fl. first century B.C.) sometime in the late first century B.C. Today’s architecture students find it on their reading lists, and it is still available in paperback

Strabo's De situ orbis printed in Venice, 1472
Article

When Johannes de Spira died in 1470, the printing business he had started was taken over by his brother, Vindelinus. Two years later, Vindelinus published Strabo’s De situ orbis, an ancient geographical text consisting of 17 books. A first edition of this work had been issued in Rome in 1469 by

Aristophanes' Nine Comedies and Aristotle's Works printed in Greek by Aldus Manutius in Venice, 1498
Article

One of the most learned scholar-printers in Venice was Aldus Manutius (1449–1515). He designed a Greek type font that, beginning about 1495, he used to print a series of texts by the ancient Greek masters. The Rakow Research Library has two of these original Aldine editions in its collection. One

Dio Cassius' Roman History printed by Robert Estienne in Paris, 1548
Article

One might say that the 16 th century scholar-printer Robert Estienne (1503-1559) inherited from Aldus Manutius the mantle of Greek printing. At the very least, he must have felt an affinity with Aldus based on his love for the ancient Greek writings and his desire to render them in modern

Flavius Josephus’ books on Jewish history printed by Johann Schüssler in Augsburg, 1470
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One of the most reliable sources of ancient Jewish history is Flavius Josephus (about 37–97 A.D.), a native of Jerusalem and a learned statesman who became a favorite of Roman emperors. His two chief works, De bello Judaico (The Jewish war) and De antiquitate Judaica (Jewish antiquities), are bound

Isaac Newton, Opticks: Or, a Treatise of the Reflexions, Refractions, Inflexions and Colours of Light, 1704
Article

Isaac Newton (1642–1727) is often described as the greatest of all scientific thinkers. He is most famous, perhaps, for having formulated the universal law of gravitation, as well as the laws of motion. However, his interests also included alchemy, theology, mathematics, and the branch of physics

Udagawa Yoan and William Henry, Seimi Kaiso: A Japanese chemistry text in seven volumes, published in Edo (Tokyo), 1837
Article

Seimi Kaiso plays an important role in the remarkable story of Western scientific influences in Japan. When this work first appeared in 1837, Japan had been almost completely isolated from the larger world for two centuries. The Japanese were not allowed to travel abroad, and only the Chinese and

Vannoccio Biringuccio, De la pirotechnia, 1540
Article

The technology of printing with movable type, which had been invented in the mid-15th century, was still in its youth when Vannoccio Biringuccio’s comprehensive work on metallurgy, De la pirotechnia, was published in Venice in 1540. The phenomenon of the printed book spread knowledge and encouraged

Pliny the Elder (Gaius Plinius Secundus), Historia naturalis, about A.D. 77
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First printed edition published by Johannes de Spira, Venice, 1469 A chief idea in ancient thought and in Renaissance Humanism was the centrality of the individual in the world. Accordingly, the natural world was considered to be less a manifestation of a divine creator and more a stage for the

Lorenzo Magalotti, Saggi di naturali esperienze, 1667
Article

The Saggi di naturali esperienze / fatte nell’Accademia del cimento sotto la protezione del serenissimo principe Leopoldo di Toscana e descritte del segretario di essa Accademia is a landmark publication in the history of experimental science. It describes experiments conducted by members of the

Bartholomaeus Anglicus, De Proprietatibus Rerum
Article

The encyclopedia titled De Proprietatibus Rerum (On the properties of things) was one of the most influential and widely published pedagogical works of the late medieval period. Originally written in Latin in the mid-13th century, it contained 19 books in a single volume that was meant to encompass

Antonio Neri, L’Arte vetraria, 1612
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As the Italian Renaissance entered its last century and Galileo Galilei was using his telescope to advance the science of astronomy, a Florentine priest named Antonio Neri was writing a guide for glassmakers that would inform their craft for the next 200 years. Titled L’Arte vetraria (The art of

The History of Science and Technology in the Rakow Library
Article

The scientific resources housed in the Rakow Library chronicle the mutual history of glass and science. They reveal how glass was both a subject and a tool of scientific study. They also highlight the different channels of scientific communication, beginning with the Medieval manuscript of the

[Studio Talk].
Library

The International Studio, v. 26 (1905), pp. 68-69, ill. AI92295 Illustration and brief description of a stained glass window, designed by Charles Dawson and executed by Alex. Gascoyne. Digitized by Boston Photo in April 2013. CitationDB 0C6BEADE-91DB-475A-A652-D22918283C32.pdf Dawson, Charles Art

[Studio-Talk].
Library

The International Studio, v. 26 (1905), p. 260, ill. AI92300 Brief mention and illustration of cartoons for stained glass, designed by Nicole D'Ascenzo. Digitized by Boston Photo in April 2013. CitationDB 6F5729B3-78E2-410F-8374-E1CD08FEE363.pdf D'Ascenzo, Nicole Glass painting and

The Window Opening in Decoration.
Library

The International Studio, v. 26 (1905), pp. XIV-XIX, ill. AI92294 Use of stained glass windows in architecture, with focus on Tiffany Studios. Digitized by Boston Photo in April 2013. Includes CMoG object: 76.4.22, p. XV. CitationDB 6A0DD219-927D-4D04-9463-D70253331759.pdf Tiffany Studios Glass

Leopold Blaschka and Rudolf Blaschka: Drawings for Glass Models of Marine Invertebrates
Article

Although many people have either heard about or visited the Harvard collection of glass flowers, few are familiar with their creators, the father and son model makers, Leopold (1822-1895) and Rudolf (1857-1939) Blaschka. Fewer still know about the Blaschkas’ models of soft-bodied undersea creatures

Prix-courant des cheminées 1896-1897.
Library

Cristalleries du Val-Saint-Lambert, Seraing, Belgium. 133354 [Seraing]: Cristalleries du Val-Saint Lambert, 1896. [6] p. 31 cm. Val-Saint-Lambert, Cristalleries du Cover title. Trade catalog. Believed that "B" is for Belgian prices, and "E" is for prices abroad. Purchase;

[Lustres].
Library

Cristalleries du Val-Saint-Lambert, Seraing, Belgium. 133360 [Seraing]: Cristalleries du Val-Saint-Lambert, [1898-1900] [3] plates: ill.; 35 cm. Val-Saint-Lambert, Cristalleries du Trade catalog. Handwritten price lists on back of each plate. Chandeliers for electric and gas lighting. Purchase;

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