Featured Objects from Glass of the Maharajahs

Featured exhibition objects from Glass of the Maharajahs: European %%Cut%% Glass Furnishings for Indian Royalty.

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    At the 1900 world's fair in Paris, the Parisian department store Le Grand Dépôt displayed a sculpture in the form of a boat. It was designed by Charles Vital Cornu (1851-1927) and created in glass and bronze by Baccarat. Following the exposition, this scupture remained in Baccarat's shop until it was purchased in 1930 by Sri Ganga Singhji Bahadur, the maharajah of Bikaner. It is housed today in the Lallgarh Palace in Bikaner. The maharajah was one of Baccarat's regular customers, and the palace contains several examples of pieces made by the company. Another boat produced by the factory remained there for some years, and it is not known when it was sold. It was part of a lot with a rectangular glass table that was offered for sale at a Parisian auction in 1979, and both of these objects are now in the collection of The Corning Museum of Glass. The company's records do not state when these pieces were united, but it seems likely that they were together in the Baccarat showroom after 1900, and they were probably purchased at the time.
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    The handle for a fly whisk is evidently glass produced in Europe for use in India and may also be an Osler product. Elaborately decorated whisks were used in both ceremonial and practical contexts, and are often illustrated in paintings of Indian nobility, being held by the ruler's servant who stands nearby.
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    This 18-light candelabrum design, made several times over two decades, was originally designed for kerosene in 1881, adapted for candles in 1883, and made for electricity in the 1890s.
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