Junior Curator Favorites 2014

To prepare for curating the show, Junior Curators toured the Museum, The Studio, and the Rakow Research Library; studied glassworking techniques; and made their own glass flowers and beads at The Studio. They also ventured behind the scenes and learned the responsibilities of museum specialists, including the conservator, registrar, librarian, and curatorial assistant. One of their most rewarding experiences was a question and answer session with the Museum’s curators.

The Junior Curators repeatedly surveyed the glass in The Studio and considered important questions: How was each object made? What relationships exist between the objects? How can we help our audience engage with the objects? As they examined The Studio collection, the Junior Curators analyzed why their favorite pieces appealed to them - whimsy, detail, fragility, nature, opposites, and patterns – and thought about what brings all of these together. The 2014 Junior Curators selected a wide range of glass art to illustrate the theme of connections through imagination.

This collection set highlights some of their favorite experiences. 

  • Artwork
    We chose this piece for our labels and graphics because of its many colors and how it caught your eye the second you looked at it .
  • Biography
    Gianni Toso’s family has a 700-year-long uninterrupted tradition of making glass. When Toso was just a boy (10 years old in fact) he started working in a glass factory with his parents. There he spent twelve hours each day feeding wood into the factory’s furnace. In 1957, at age 14, Toso was accepted into the Abate Vincenzo Zanetti, the fine arts academy for master glass blowers on the island of Murano. For 14 years he studied under the finest glassblowing masters on the island, learning their tricks and secrets. Today, he is widely recognized as one of the world's finest glassblowers.
  • Artwork
    This is a piece of Venetian glass, which was one of the first pieces acquired by the museum in 1953. It was chosen for our collection for it's interesting shape and details.
  • Biography
    Lino Tagliapietra is a Venetian glassblower who discovered his interest at a young age, shortly after World War II. Initially, Tagliapietra’s family did not support him in his hopes to become an artist, but Tagliapietra persisted and became a maestro at the age of 21. He continued to work with glass, making pieces incorporating elements from different cultures, as well as shaping the world of contemporary glass. Tagliapietra’s piece Endeavor is currently in the Museum’s collection. He is regarded as the foremost glassblower in the world today.
  • Artwork
    The artist used contemporary culture of the 1960's and the 1970's and historic technichques to make a statement through this piece.
  • Biography
    Treg Silkwood was born in Montana and grew up working with his hands. He went to Alfred University and graduated the top of his class of the Art and Design school. For many years he was a production glass blower for the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village. He worked as a gaffer for the Hot Glass Road Show of the Corning Museum of Glass, and has taught glassblowing at multiple institutions and schools in the U.S. After marrying his wife, Candace Martin, they started the Silkwood Glass,a hand-crafted glass company.
  • Artwork
    The chess pieces are made in the form of Jewish and Roman Catholic religious figures. A Jewish rabbi and a Roman Catholic bishop (kings) join a group of holy men and women holding Judeo-Christian symbols of faith, including crosses, Torahs, menorahs, and single candles. Each chess piece has the appropriate costume, hairstyle, and accessory of its rank. It is also one of my favorite pieces.
  • Biography
    Amber Cowan is a sculptor and experienced glass artist who has been working with glass for 12 years. She graduated from Salisbury University in Maryland with her Bachelor of Fine Arts. She then went to Tyler School of Art at Temple University to receive her Master of Fine Arts and the Steve Stormer Award. Cowan is currently working in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, glassblowing and flameworking with hot recycled glass. Her work has been shown at Heller Gallery in New York City and The Corning Museum of Glass.
  • Artwork
    This was once a dusty piece of glass in the corner of the museum. Now, with the new renovations, it is displayed in all its colorful glory. We saw it in the Heineman Gallery.
  • Biography
    Jiyong Lee is a South Korean glass artist who specializes in coldworking. He loves to use science, especially biology, to create interesting glass. Each of his pieces is inspired by his fascination with electrophoresis - a process used to analyze macromolecules - to create structures similar to the structure of a cell. He first came to the Studio in 1998 when he was a graduate student at RIT. He later came back as an intern, and now teaches about his particular approach to coldworking at The Studio.
  • Artwork
    In our gallery tour we saw Uranium glass. The radiation can be detected with a Geiger Counter.
  • Biography
    Lucio Bubacco is commonly associated with his mixture of gothic architecture and Greek mythology with human and fantasy figures. All of his figures are hand formed and incorporated into blown vases and castings. His work is on display in galleries and museums around the world.
  • Page
    The Junior Curators saw this gallery while the new objects were being installed.
  • Biography
    Warren is an artistic guy who gave us a wonderful behind-the-scenes tour to see what no one else got to.
  • CMOG Exhibition
    This Junior Curators saw this exhibition while it was under construction.
  • Page
    The Junior Curators toured the Library and researched the artists whose objects they chose for their exhibition.
  • Biography
    Beth is an intelligent women who helped us plan schemes and educated us about everything.
  • Library
    The Mappae clavicula is the oldest book in the library (c. 1150). It is handwritten in Latin. The binding is new because the original binding was ruined in the flood of 1972.
  • Biography
    Rebecca is a bright women who kept us on our feet and taught us many things.
  • Page
    The Junior Curators made glass flowers and glass beads at the Studio.