Kids’ Favorites

Kids love the Glass Collection at The Corning Museum of Glass! Whether on a school field trip, completing a scavenger hunt with their families in the galleries, or on cmog.org, kids of all ages find fun and unexpected glass pieces at the Museum. Visitors of all ages enjoy the Kids’ Favorites!

  • Artwork
    Archaeology is one of the ways that scholars discover information about cultures from long ago. Excavators can discover glass objects that inform us about the daily lives of people, but they can also unearth evidence like the remains of an original Roman glass furnace.
  • Article
    Learn more about the construction and excavation of the Beth She’arim slab and how we know more about the ancient glass industry because of it.
  • Artwork
    Ancient Egyptian glassmakers created colored glass that looked like gems and hard stones. Although made of glass, this man’s face looks like turquoise. How many pieces go together to make this figure?
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    Don’t try this at home! When you try to fill this glass with liquid, some of the tubes and bulbs remain empty. If you try to drink from the glass, the air in the tubes makes the liquid gush out when you least expect it.
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    When you rub your wet finger around the rim of a glass, it produces a tone. Benjamin Franklin took that idea even further and invented America’s first musical instrument - the “glass armonica.” Imagine yourself playing these spinning bowls like a piano. The sounds produced resemble those of the flute and violin. View the Multimedia to hear a glass harmonica in action.
  • Artwork
    Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka – two of our heroes – made this glass eye about 100 years ago. They made thousands of glass eyes, and models of invertebrates (animals without backbones), flowers, and plants, for museums and colleges all over the world.
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    He’s watching you! Whether you move to the left or the right, the deeply-engraved head of the emperor appears to be staring at you.

    watch: Engraving Lathe
    In order to achieve the three-dimensional effect of the details on this engraved plaque, an engraving lathe was used. By holding the glass against spinning, grinding wheels, rich, deep detail can be achieved. So much detail, that the emperor comes to life!

  • Video

    This glass baseball bat was presented to “Honest” Eddie Murphy of the Philadelphia Athletics, winners of the World Series in 1913. The Athletics had a great team.

    To attain the beautiful facets on the surface of this bat, the glass cutter would use different wheels, then polish all of the cuts. watch: Lathe Cutting to see how it’s done.

  • Artwork
    This glass slipper was made in Corning, New York, to be worn in a movie about Cinderella. The movie was never made and—as far as we know—the slipper was never worn.
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    Josh Simpson, who made Megaplanet, loves images of the earth. He created this huge planet (perhaps the biggest paperweight in the world) when the Museum challenged him to make a paperweight that weighed 100 pounds. It weighs 107 pounds.
  • Artwork

    Can you imagine making this 3-foot sphere from hundreds of fragile pieces of glass? And can you imagine picking it up? It takes three of the Museum’s expert handlers to move this object, created by Susan Plum, from one place to another.

    watch: Flameworked Sculpture
    In this video, you’ll discover the possibilities when using flameworking for sculpture. Think of how much time it must have taken to make Woven Heaven, Tangled Earth.