Assembled Foldscope (TM) with Accessories

Object Name: 
Assembled Foldscope (TM) with Accessories

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Object Name: 
Assembled Foldscope (TM) with Accessories
Accession Number: 
2016.8.2 A
Dimensions: 
(abc) Foldscope with Sliding Stage and Light Module Holder H: 8.2 cm, W: 17.7 cm, D: 1.2 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
2014
Primary Description: 
Assembled Foldscope (TM) with Accessories. (a) White polypropylene folded Foldscope with printed design on front consisting of trees, leaves, and cells. Rectangular paper label affixed to back of Foldscope. Unique inventory number printed on sticker along with image of a small animal holding a nut. (b) White polypropylene folded sliding stage. (c) White polypropylene light module holder; printed circuit board with LED and battery mount (for 3 volt lithium CR2032 battery) affixed to back of plastic light module holder with double-sided adhesive tape. (d) Thin polypropylene sheet with laser-cut outlines of Foldscope, sliding stage, LED holder, magnet holder, and six slides (Foldscope, sliding stage, and LED holder have been removed). (e) Black polypropylene low-magnification lens (with glass bead). (f) Black polypropylene high-magnification lens and lens holder assembled using double-sided adhesive tape. (g) Black polypropylene magnet strip for Foldscope with black adhesive backing. (h) Black polypropylene magnet strip for phone with silver adhesive backing. (i) Sheet of sixty transparent stickers for use with slides. Every other sticker inscribed with a number from #01 to #30.
Provenance: 
Corning Museum of Glass Education Department, Source
2015
to
2016-04-07
Stanford University, Former Collection
2014
to
2015
Color: 
Inscription: 
Prakash Lab / Stanford
inscription
Printed (a) near corner of Foldscope in script
0 1 2 4 5 cm
inscription
Printed (a) along one side of Foldscope
Foldscope™
inscription
Printed (b) on top of sliding stage
? Some flies have up to 4,000 lenses in each eye.
inscription
Printed (d) on polypropylene sheet in blue
? Fish and insects do not have eyelids.
inscription
Printed (d) on polypropylene sheet in orange
? Most spiders have eight eyes.
inscription
Printed (d) on polypropylene sheet in purple
? A butterfly has taste receptors on its feet.
inscription
Printed (d) on polypropylene sheet in orange
? There are more insects in one square mile of a rural land than there are human beings on earth.
inscription
Printed (d) on polypropylene sheet in olive green
? The average human has 10 times as many bacterial cells as human cells.
inscription
Printed (d) on polypropylene sheet in blue green
[image of small animal holding a nut] / 0001 / B98D / 8F3A / foldscope.com
label
Affixed (a) on back of Foldscope rectangular white paper label
Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2016-04-23 through 2017-03-19
Glass made it possible for scientists and artists to see tiny living creatures once invisible to the human eye. Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope tells the stories of scientists’ and artists’ exploration of the microscopic world between the 1600s and the late 1800s. Their discoveries fed people’s hunger to learn more about nature, increasing the popularity of microscopes and driving improvements in scientific glass. These advances culminated in the 19th century with the advent of modern scientific glassmaking and the perfection of the microscope. Unleash your sense of discovery as you explore the invisible through historic microscopes, rare books, and period illustrations.
Acquisitions (2017) illustrated, p. 57 (#38); BIB# AI103665