Chevron Beads

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Object Name: 
Chevron Beads
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
62.3.9
Dimensions: 
Overall (closed) L: 18.8 cm, W: 15.5 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
about 1600-1700
Primary Description: 
Chevron Beads. White, black, red, and blue Non-lead glass; cased, drawn, ground. Chevron Beads with dark or translucent core with white, black, white, red, white, blue layers.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Carlebach Gallery, Source
1962
Category: 
In Sparkling Company: Glass and Social Life in Britain during the 1700s
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2021-05 through 2022-01-02
In 2020, the Corning Museum of Glass (CMoG) will present In Sparkling Company: Glass and Social Life in Britain during the 1700s; an exhibition exploring the role of glass, light and reflectivity in eighteenth-century social life. In the 1700s, Britain was a vibrant and commercial nation. Its growing cities were hubs of sociability, scientific advancement, trade, and finance. From glittering costume and elaborately presented confectionery, to polished mirrors and dazzling chandeliers, glass helped define the social rituals and cultural values of the period. While new innovations in glass delighted the wealthy, the material also bore witness to the ambitions of colonization and the horrors of the African slave trade. Glass beads were traded for human lives and elegant glass dishes, baskets and bowls held sweet delicacies made with sugar produced by enslaved labor. Underpinning Britain’s prosperity were aggressive foreign trade policies, colonization and a far-reaching economy of enslavement, the profits of which funded the pleasures and innovations of the fashionable world. Beginning in the intimate setting of a private dressing room, with a magnificent silver gilt dressing service made for the Duchess of Portland in about 1700, learn about how the elite prepared themselves for a night of revelry and entertainment. See the dazzling clothes and accessories worn by the ‘polished’ individual and understand the rules that governed how they behaved. Enter a specially commissioned virtual reality reconstruction of the remarkable and innovative glass-paneled drawing room designed for the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland in 1775, an interior that hasn’t been seen for nearly 200 years. Become immersed in the glittering nightlife of British elite and feel the tension between the exuberance of the fashionable world and the human cost of such sparkling company. Through a lens of glass, see what it meant to be ‘modern’ in the 1700s, and what it cost.
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2013-05-18 through 2014-01-05
For 30,000 years, mankind has crafted beads from natural materials. With the discovery of glassmaking in the second millennium B.C., glass began to be used for this same purpose. Glass beads are universal. They have been produced throughout the 35 centuries of glass manufacturing, and by nearly every culture in the world. The glass beads and beaded objects on view in this exhibition are arranged thematically, comparing the manner in which diverse cultures have utilized beads, frequently for the same purposes, but sometimes for unique reasons. These themes explore how glass beads adorn the body and our possessions; how they convey messages about power and wealth, and identify the stages of human life; how they serve ritual purposes, as well as decorate clothing and objects used in rituals; and how they have been employed across the centuries as a means of exchange, both commercial and cultural. Through the centuries, beads have been made using a variety of processes. Understanding how beads were made has allowed scholars to follow the transmission of beads and beadmaking techniques across the globe. Across time and around the world, glass beads have become a common element of mankind. Through their manufacture and function, they are one of the strings that bind humanity together. “Life on a String” celebrates this common bond while also revealing the distinctiveness of different societies through their use of glass beads to celebrate their unique cultural heritage.
 
Create Jewelry Glass (2009) illustrated, p. 15; BIB# 108860