Host (Gold)

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Object Name: 
Sculpture
Title: 
Host (Gold)
Accession Number: 
2011.4.78
Dimensions: 
(b) Glass Sculpture with Curly Hair H: 14 cm, W: 21 cm, D: 24 cm; (e) Wood Base H: 3.2 cm, W: 122.2 cm, D: 30.8 cm
Location: 
On Display
Date: 
1997
Credit Line: 
Gift of the artist
Web Description: 
Jack Wax makes objects in glass and mixed media that are both conceptual and emotional. They are abstract and formal, but also very personal. For Wax, the creation of sculptural form is tied to memory, to the experience of emotions processed not only through the mind but also through the body. Wax made the Hosts while reflecting on his experience of living for six years in Japan. For him, a perfect host is someone who puts the visitor at ease, is honestly interested in what he or she has to say, and makes one feel welcome by offering his home as the visitor’s home. In Japan, Wax always felt like a guest, never at home and never truly welcome. “Host (Gold) and Host (Iron) are two small, quiet monuments that address my feelings and thoughts on the experiences of being a gaijin [foreigner] in Japan,” Wax says. “[I felt] . . . exposed to a quiet and subtle racism, sexism, and ageism to a degree that I had never before . . . experienced. Subsequently, [I made] . . . my decisions about ‘white’ hair, ‘brown’ hair, aged/rusted ‘iron’ hair, and tarnishing ‘gold’ hair.” Although the sculptures are similar, Wax’s intention is to reiterate, but not duplicate, the concerns that they address. The Hosts illustrate Wax’s preference, at the time, for collections of objects offering opportunities for comparison and dialogue. The wigs, or heads of hair, are meant to be serial and are presented in a formal way. They symbolize “sameness,” “otherness,” and a tendency to conformity that reflect Wax’s sense of displacement. Host (Gold) signed “Jack L Wax / 9-96” and “Jack L Wax / signed -1997 / June 3rd / HOSTS / (GOLD)”; Host (Iron) signed “Jack L. Wax” and “HOST (IRON) / Jack L. Wax / June 5, 1997.” Published in Susanne K. Frantz, Yoriko Mizuta, and Helmut Ricke, The Glass Skin, Corning: The Corning Museum of Glass, 1998, pp. 110–111.
Provenance: 
Wax, Jack (American, b. 1954), Source
1997
to
2011
Inscription: 
Jack L Wax / 9-96
signature
Stamped (c) on interior in mold
Jack L Wax / 9-96
signature
Stamped (d) on interior in mold
"Jack L Wax" / signed - 1997 / June 3rd / "HOSTS" / (GOLD)
signature
Marker (e) on bottom
AIR Research Technologies LTD / AIR / Ltd.
signature
Stamped (c) on interior in mold
AIR Research Technologies LTD / AIR / Ltd.
signature
Stamped (d) on interior in mold
Primary Description: 
Mold-blown glass, cut; cast brass; wood.
The Studio at 20
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2016-05-26 through 2017-01-22
For 20 years, The Studio has been a starting point for emerging artists and an incubator for new work by established artists. The works on view in this exhibition are part of the Museum’s permanent collection and were created by artists who have taught or who have been artists in residence at The Studio. Additional pieces by this artistic community can be found in the Glass Collection Galleries, where they are identified by The Studio at 20 symbol. The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass is a community of artists who come together to learn, create, and teach. Since opening its doors in 1996, The Studio has welcomed more than 20,000 students, instructors, and resident artists from around the world. What sets this teaching institution apart from others are the unique combination of facilities, the talented and dedicated staff, the inspiration of the Museum’s rich historical glass collection, and the significant holdings and staff assistance in the Rakow Research Library. In addition to being an internationally renowned glass teaching facility, The Studio is a place where artists come to make their work. A residency program supports 10–12 artists per year. Artists are selected through an application process and live and work in Corning for one month, fully supported by the staff of The Studio. The Studio is open to the public, so please stop in during your visit to the Museum. Learn more about classes, special programs, artist residencies, and instructors at The Studio.
The Glass Skin
Venue(s)
Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art 1997-10-01 through 1997-11-16
Corning Museum of Glass 1998-05-16 through 1998-10-18
Dusseldorf Kuntsmuseum 1999-02-14 through 1999-04-21
 
The Corning Museum of Glass Annual Report 2011 (2012) illustrated, p. 9;
The Corning Museum of Glass: Notable Acquisitions 2011 (2012) illustrated, p. 61; BIB# AI87745
Recent Important Acquisitions (New Glass Review 33) (2012) illustrated, p. 124, bottom; BIB# AI87134
The Glass Skin (1998) illustrated, p. 111, #66; BIB# 58897
The Glass Skin (1998) illustrated, p. 113, #66; BIB# 61912
The glass skin : garasu no shinseiki : sekai 20-sakka no chōsen (1997) illustrated, p. 105, #66; BIB# 72368