Mug

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Object Name: 
Mug
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
57.3.96
Dimensions: 
(a&b) H: 19.6 cm; (a) H: 17.6 cm; D (rim): 5.4 cm, (max. body): 10.5 cm
Location: 
On Display
Date: 
1579
Credit Line: 
Gift of Edwin J. Beinecke
Primary Description: 
Transparent bubbly deep blue glass; wear marks at base; free- blown, enameled and gilded. Spherical body with wide cylindrical neck and applied double walled foot having rough pontil mark; below neck an applied ring, around upper shoulder an applied rigaree band and pear-shaped handle applied to upper neck and shoulder; pewter top attached to upper handle, with thumb piece and small finial, having on the inside the mark, "R"; enamel decoration: a frieze on the upper body, in multicolored enamel shows three "portrait" busts, with the heads turned in profile, and separated by lily-of-the-valley stalks with yellow and brown-red leaves; the one on the left is a woman with a crown-like head gear, the central one apparently a "shepherd" with a wide funnel-like fur hat, the one on the right with an elaborate head gear, a large gray cap attached to a white and yellow scarf, with a large red flower; bottom of frieze is framed by a green line; around the neck the date in large green Roman letters: "MDLXXIX", framed by three lines in white and red; below rim, above the applied thread, a gilded band (partly rubbed off) studded with turquoise beads and accompanied on top by two rows of white beads; on the top of the foot, in white, a monogram consisting of two interlinked C's; at base in large white numerals: "1383" and a cross.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Count Wilchek, Former Collection
Beinecke, Edwin J. (d. 1957), Source
Category: 
German Enameled Glass (1965) illustrated, pp. 246-247, #3; p. 171; BIB# 18098
Die Deutschen Renaissanceglaser auf der Burg Kreuzenstein (1926) p. 44, fig. 22;