Red Blood Cell Prototype

Object Name: 
Red Blood Cell Prototype

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Object Name: 
Red Blood Cell Prototype
Accession Number: 
GL133
Dimensions: 
Overall H: 7.4 cm, W: 19.8 cm, D: 18.9 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
2011
Web Description: 
The designer was inspired by anatomical picture books and models of the body to explore new shapes for vessels.
Provenance: 
GlassLab, Source
2011
to
2011-12-31
Technique: 
Material: 
Primary Description: 
Red Blood Cell Prototype. Blown glass.
Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2016-04-23 through 2017-03-19
Glass made it possible for scientists and artists to see tiny living creatures once invisible to the human eye. Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope tells the stories of scientists’ and artists’ exploration of the microscopic world between the 1600s and the late 1800s. Their discoveries fed people’s hunger to learn more about nature, increasing the popularity of microscopes and driving improvements in scientific glass. These advances culminated in the 19th century with the advent of modern scientific glassmaking and the perfection of the microscope. Unleash your sense of discovery as you explore the invisible through historic microscopes, rare books, and period illustrations.
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2012-05-19 through 2013-01-06
“Making Ideas: Experiments in Design at GlassLab” showcases the Museum’s signature design program, GlassLab, in which designers are invited to work with hot glass. The exhibition features over 150 design prototypes by more than 45 international designers. Over the last decade, the field of design has shifted from a focus on industry and architecture to a practice increasingly informed by contemporary art and craft. Glass, in particular, is being used in newly expressive ways as a result of increased access to the molten material through programs such as GlassLab. Working with the Museum’s artist-glassblowers outside the context of factory production, designers are able to explore concepts and to learn about the properties of glass in ways that were not previously possible. Presented in 2012 on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of American studio glass, this exhibition celebrates the spirit of freedom and experimentation with material and process that characterized the early years of the Studio Glass movement. At The Corning Museum of Glass, exhibitions honoring the history of studio glass in the United States and in Europe highlight individual artists. They are “Founders of American Studio Glass: Harvey K. Littleton” (on the West Bridge), “Founders of American Studio Glass: Dominick Labino (in the Rakow Research Library), and “Masters of Studio Glass: Erwin Eisch (in the Focus Gallery).