Biography: Thomas Phifer

Name: 
Thomas Phifer

Thomas Phifer approaches modernism from a humanistic standpoint, connecting the built environment to the natural world with a heightened sense of openness and community spirit that is based on a collaborative, interdisciplinary process. Since %%founding%% Thomas Phifer and Partners in 1997, he has completed the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh, N.C;, the Raymond and the Susan Brochstein Pavilion at Rice University in Houston, Texas; and the %%Salt%% Point House, the Millbrook House, and the Taghkanic House, all in the Hudson River Valley of New York State.

Work under construction includes the United States Federal Courthouse in %%Salt%% Lake City, Utah and the prototype of a new street light fixture for New York City. The firm is also designing a museum for the Glenstone Foundation in Potomac, Md.; a field house and velodrome for Brooklyn Bridge Park in Brooklyn, N.Y.; a federal office building in San Juan, Puerto Rico; and houses in Madison, Wis., and Dallas, Texas.

Phifer’s buildings have been repeatedly honored by the American Institute of Architects, including six AIA National Honor Awards and 21 AIA New York Honor Awards. In 2011 the North Carolina Museum of Art won a National Honor Award from the AIA and in 2010 the Raymond and Susan Brochstein Pavilion also won a National Honor Award. The international competition-winning design for the City Lights light fixture for New York City won a Research and Development Award from Architect magazine in 2009, and in 2008 the %%Salt%% Point House won an American Architecture Award from the Chicago Athenaeum. His projects have been published and exhibited extensively in the United States and overseas.

In 2004 Phifer was awarded the Medal of Honor, the highest award given to an individual or firm, from the New York Chapter of the AIA. In 1995 he received the prestigious Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome, and in 2011 he was elected an Academician of the National Academy of Design. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and is serving as a Peer for the General Services Administration. He received his Bachelor of Architecture in 1975 and his Master of Architecture in 1977, both from Clemson University.