Hot Glass Demos at the Museum

At the Museum

Hot Glass Demos are live, narrated glassblowing demonstrations, offered all day, every day. All demos are included in the cost of admission. Allow 30 minutes per demonstration; the duration of special demos may vary. See What's Happening.

You’ll see master glassmakers take glowing gobs of molten glass on the end of a pipe and skillfully shape them into vases, bowls, or sculptures. A narrator talks through the process, and cameras inside the 2300°F furnace ensure you don’t miss a single step along the way. Watching the gaffers (another term for master glassmakers) at Hot Glass Demos will give you a unique appreciation for the skill and artistry behind the objects you’ll encounter in the Museum’s galleries. The glassblowing technique was discovered by the Romans around 50 B.C. and many of the techniques and tools used by glassmakers today have been used for thousands of years.

The demonstrators on the Hot Glass Demo are some of the best glassmakers around. They love to share their fascination with this mysterious and mesmerizing material, demonstrate their artistry and answer your questions.

Learn about the Master Glassblowers

George Kennard
Hot Glass Mobile Team Leader
George Kennard has been at the Museum since 2001, after spending eight years working in private studios. He began his tenure at the Museum as an instructor in The Studio, teaching beginning and continuing classes in glassblowing. Kennard enjoys the...
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Chris Rochelle
Hot Glass Projects Team Leader
Chris Rochelle’s path as a glass artist traces back to Hartwick College, where he studied sculpture and painting. The school’s small glass program gave him his first taste of working with this unique medium. Upon graduation, he apprenticed in a...
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Helen Tegeler
Glassblower
Helen Tegeler is inspired by the transitional properties of plants, and extrapolates upon that in her work. From growth patterns and branching to surface textures and patterns, she feels there are infinite design possibilities when interpreting...
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