Glass dishes are dropped without breaking from a height of eight feet to a hard surface [electronic resource].

Title: 
Glass dishes are dropped without breaking from a height of eight feet to a hard surface [electronic resource].

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Published In: 
Life v. 18, no. 11 (Mar. 12, 1945), p. 83
Description: 
1 page : black and white
Other Authors: 
Feininger, Andreas, 1906-1999. photographer.
Format of Material: 
Photographs
Bib ID: 
144027
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Location: 
Digital Image
Call Number: 
No call number available
Notes: 
"Made by a special formula, the glass undergoes careful tempering to give it added strength. Although the glass withstands this test it is not unbreakable. No glass is unbreakable, but its toughness is continually increasing. These dishes are used by both Army and Navy. Wall in the background is made of hollow glass blocks, widely used in modern architecture because translucent walls make rooms lighter."
Photograph included in article titled "Glass: oldest American industry finds many new uses."
Full issue of periodical can be found in the Corning Glass Works archive.
Digitized in-house April 2015 for inclusion in exhibition titled "America's Favorite Dish: Celebrating a Century of Pyrex" on display from June 6, 2015 to March 17, 2016.
Reproduction displayed in the exhibition titled "America's Favorite Dish: Celebrating a Century of Pyrex" on display from June 6, 2015 to March 17, 2016.
Series: 
Pyrex advertising and trade materials