All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Glass Question at our Rakow Research Library.

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Group Tours at The Corning Museum of Glass
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Why should you bring your group to The Corning Museum of Glass? In addition to showcasing 35 centuries of glass art and history, The Corning Museum of Glass is home to a world-class demonstration space, a stunning Contemporary Art + Design Wing, and guests can even try glassmaking themselves. With

Helena Welling and Juha Saarikko Guest Artist Demonstration (Oct 19, 2018)
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Watch Helena Welling and Juha Saarikko, Finnish glassmakers from the Iittala factory, in a live narrated demonstration in The Studio on October 19, 2018. The glassmakers produced bird designs by internationally recognized designer Oiva Toikka. See the final birds at 13:09, 42:40, and 1:45:35. The

Aaron Jack & Anna Knoll Guest Artist Demonstration
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Watch live as Aaron Jack collaborates with glass cutter Anna Knoll in the Amphitheater Hot Shop on August 23 from 6 to 8 pm. Together they will create a one-of-a-kind piece that will incorporate both of their artistic styles.

McElheny Untitled (White)
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Listen as curator Tina Oldknow, describes the object Untitled (White)  by American artist Josiah McElhany. Josiah McElheny is an accomplished glassblower who creates installations inspired by art or glass history, often using a specific historical or literary anecdote as a point of departure. His

Optic Molding
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This technique was invented by Roman glassworkers. It was indispensable in glasshouses of the Middle Ages and flourished in Venice. Also known as dip molding, it remains popular today.

Gladiator Cup with Handles
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The Chavagnes gladiator cup, made in the mid-first century A.D., was found in eastern France, and it is now part of the CMoG collection. It shows pairs of gladiators in combat, and some of their names are known from literary and epigraphic sources. This sports cup, blown in a mold with two vertical

2011 GlassFest FlameOff: Recap with Paul Stankard
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GlassFest Flameoff 2011 Recap: World-renowned glass artist Paul Stankard and World Glass store owner Josh Powers (Corning, N.Y.), reflect on their journey to  create the 2011 GlassFest FlameOff. The FlameOff showcases several artists from around the world that demonstrate their talents using a

Glass Ribbon Machine
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Watch one of the world's fastest machines in action. After Thomas Edison developed a practical and durable light bulb filament in 1879, it took time for this technology to take hold, in part because it required a new product: glass envelopes to surround the filament. When Edison first

2009 Annual Glass Art Society Conference
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Hope to see you in Corning, New York, "America's Crystal City," for the 2009 Annual Glass Art Society Conference.

Nacho Carbonell: 2011 GlassLab at the Vitra Design Museum
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https://www.cmog.org/glasslab.

Goblet Making on the Blowpipe
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A goblet—bowl, foot, and stem—is made on the blowpipe in this video. Learn more in The Techniques of Renaissance Venetian Glassworking by William Gudenrath. The Venetian glass industry enjoyed a golden age during the Renaissance. By the early 1500s, the wonders of Venetian glass were well known

Murrine Use
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Once murrine canes are cut into thin slices, they can be fused and slumped, flameworked, or blown. Here, murrine canes are used in demonstrations of a Roman period process and a Renaissance Venetian process.

Ladle Casting
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Molten glass can be cast by a method virtually identical to that used for casting metal. Here, molten glass at 2,300 degrees Fahrenheit is ladled into a mold made of sand. The process is relatively easy as hot glassworking processes go... but hot!

Cutting Glass
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Cutting thin sheet glass is almost as easy as it looks in this video clip... but not quite! Curves really are much trickier than straight lines. The process shown would have been completely familiar to medieval window glaziers.

Flameworked Beads
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Flameworking (sometimes called "lampworking") is the process of directing a flame onto a piece of glass in order to create form or decoration. Beads were likely among the first glass objects to be made by flameworking.

Flameworking Glass Sculptures
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Learn about flameworking with Corning Museum of Glass experts. Flameworking is the technique of taking glass rods or tubes and heating them in a concentrated flame until they become soft.

Chunk Casting
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Chunks of glass are placed in a mold, then heated in a kiln until the glass softens and flows downward to gradually fill the mold. Popular with contemporary artists, this method avoids the need for a giant melting furnace filled with molten glass.

Coloring Objects
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Five different methods of using colored glass are demonstrated; some produce a uniformly colored object, others a splotchy or mottled effect. Glass artists today use whatever method best suits their aesthetic choices.

Bowl with Roman Foot and Folded Edge
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Roman glassworkers, tirelessly creative and inventive, were fond of folding and manipulating inflated glass in a variety of ways for different purposes. Two of their characteristic structures—both functional and beautiful—are demonstrated.

Cameo Glass
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Discover the history of Roman cameo glass, and lean how it is made, with experts at The Corning Museum of Glass. This video was featured in the exhibit Reflecting Antiquity at The Corning Museum of Glass, February 15 through May 27, 2008.

Glass Jug inside of a Jug
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Watch experts at The Corning Museum of Glass recreate one of the stranger glass pieces made in Roman times — a jug inside of another, larger jug! This video was featured in the exhibit Reflecting Antiquity at The Corning Museum of Glass, February 15 through May 27, 2008.

Pâte de Verre
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This is another casting technique that—like glassblowing—only works with glass. Whereas glassblowing was invented about 50 BC, pâte de verre is a process invented in France in the 19th century. It allows subtle gradations of color, possible with no other glassworking process.

Flameworked Vessels
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Beginning in the 1800s, glassworkers used flameworking to make vessels considerably larger than previously possible. Bigger and more sophisticated torches allowed the increase in scale, while retaining the flameworker's ability to create minute details.

Cracking Off
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As if glassblowing wasn't fast enough—it takes under three minutes to make a Roman bottle—cracking-off made the process even faster. This technique was well known by AD 20 or so, and cut the manufacturing time of simple tumblers in half.

Making Iridized Glass
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Learn about ancient iridized glass and a method for creating iridized glass surfaces. This video was featured in the exhibit Reflecting Antiquity  at The Corning Museum of Glass, February 15 through May 27, 2008. Note: the method portrayed uses stannous chloride fumes, which can be highly toxic. Do

Cane Making
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While glass canes can be used alone, for example as stirring rods, usually they are incorporated in vessels or sculpture. An infinite variety of decoration is possible. Here we see two examples that are intended to be viewed from the side.

Building a Goblet on a Blowpipe
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Here is virtuoso Venetian-style glassblowing "without a net." One mistake and all is lost! Where "making a goblet from parts" allows mistakes to be isolated and destroyed, this process moves relentlessly forward, allowing no retakes.

Fusing and Slumping
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Popular among glass artists today, as it was in the golden age of Greece and the Roman Empire, this technique softens and shapes glass in a kiln. Various preparatory steps are shown in the making of a contemporary sculpture.

Learn About Glass Enameling
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It could have been so simple... but it wasn't! Until recent times (about 1800), permanent enamels had to be fired on glass vessels by an amazingly laborious process, shown here. Today, the process really is as easy as it looks.

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