All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Glass Question at our Rakow Research Library.

Leaf Beakers and Roman Mold-blown Glass Production in the First Century A.D.
Article

In 1985, The J. Paul Getty Museum acquired a Roman mold-blown vessel that dates to the first century A.D. 1 Made of pale yellow-green glass, the beaker was blown in a three-part mold. 2 Its exterior decoration consists of a simply designed foliate relief frieze of four vertical plants, each of which is a straight stem with nine alternating plain and decorated leaves.

Engraving Lathe
Video

Essentially the same as lathe cutting, the engraving lathe is generally used for small-scale projects often involving the creation of extremely fine details, such as the eyelashes on a portrait.

Engraving Lathe- Family Technique
Video

Traditional glass engravers use copper wheels mounted on a lathe. The wheels come in many shapes and sizes. An abrasive slurry drips onto the wheel as the engraver works on the design.

Engraving Lathe- Family
Video

Traditional glass engravers use copper wheels mounted on a lathe. The wheels come in many shapes and sizes. An abrasive slurry drips onto the wheel as the engraver works on the design.

Rotary polishing
Glass Dictionary Term

The process of polishing an object with tools and an abrasive while turning it on a lathe. rotary-polishing rotary-polish rotary polish rotary polished rotary-polished

Mandrel
Glass Dictionary Term

In glassworking, (1) a lathe shaft with a hollow end, designed to receive spindles; (2) a metal rod around which beads and other small objects can be formed. mandrels mandral mandrals mandrel-wound mandrel-work

Lathe cutting
Glass Dictionary Term

The technique whereby a blank in the general shape of the finished object is mounted on a lathe and (in antiquity) turned with the aid of a bow or handled wheel, while a tool fed with abrasive is held against the surface in order to polish it, modify the profile, or cut it. lathe cut lathe cuts

Bow lathe
Glass Dictionary Term

A primitive lathe powered by the use of a bow. The bowstring is looped around the spindle of the lathe and causes it to rotate as the bow is drawn backward and forward. bow lathes

Lathe Cutting
Video

Here is everything you might want to know about how cut glass gets its decoration. Battuto cutting, much loved by contemporary Venetian glass artists and their followers, is also shown. Incredibly ancient in origin, the process is still widely appealing.

The Seasons Vase
Article

The "Vase des Saisons" is the name given by Jean de Foville to a cameo glass bottle in the Cabinet des Medailles et Antiques of the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris. (Figs. A, B, C "Alabastron en verre camée" (Camée.623)). The object may be described as follows: H. (as restored) 16.5 cm. Opaque white over translucent deep blue glass. Cast or blown, cased, cut, engraved, ground, and polished. Bottle. Narrow cylindrical neck; flat shoulder; slender body with straight, slightly flaring side; tapering base, rounded at bottom.

The Thomas Panel
Article

The Thomas Panel (Fig. 1 [86.1.1]) is an example of late Roman opus sectile wall decoration made of glass. The object, which is said to have been found in the Faiyum, 100 kilometers southwest of Cairo, was acquired by The Corning Museum of Glass in 1986.

Frederick Carder’s Journal of His 1902 Visit to Germany, Bohemia, and Austria
Article

In 2005, the Rakow Research Library of The Corning Museum of Glass received a small spiral-bound notebook containing Frederick Carder’s handwritten notes from his three-week trip in 1902 to glasshouses in Germany, Bohemia, and Austria. 1 Carder, a designer at Stevens & Williams in Brierley Hill, Staffordshire, was interested in glass technology and marketing, and he had been sent on a fact-finding mission by the Staffordshire Technical Instruction Committee of the Staffordshire County Council. As a part-time glass instructor at the Wordsley School of Art, he was a Council employee.

Meet the Artist: April Surgent
Article

April Surgent rethinks engraving and cameo techniques, reaching back to antiquity to create works that look painterly, photographic, and contemporary. Her images come to light through precise cutting and the grinding away of fused glass layers, usually milky white on the top with darker strata below. The size, thickness, and flatness of these objects reference panel or easel painting, as do her diptych and triptych compositions. Through years of experimentation, Surgent has realized a language of subtractive marks that range from the exacting to the expressive.

Notes on glassmaking & other subjects as occured [sic] / F. Carder.
Library

Carder, Frederick. 112178 Notes on glassmaking and other subjects as occurred Archives finding aid title: Dark blue notebook II: notes on glassmaking & other subjects as occurred F. Carder, 1888 1888-1907. 1 v. (unpaged): ill.; 18 x 12 cm. R-1058 Caption title. Archives. This item is in the Frederick Carder notebook collection. Dark blue ledger with plain covers and no special endpapers. Only the first 74 p. and last 26 p. were used. Entries at the end are dated between 1902-1907 and are not in chronological order.

Meet the Artist: Isabel De Obaldía
Transcript

Corning Museum of Glass, December 22, 2009 Tina Oldknow:   Hello everyone, good evening and welcome back after everyone’s been gone on tours and all kinds of things. I hope that our seminarians enjoyed the various tours that we offered.  I am very pleased to introduce you to the 2009 Rakow Commission artist who is Isabel De Obaldía from Panama City, Panama.  Isabel has come a long way to be with us tonight, and she has brought her husband, Horacio Icaza, and her son, Pedro Icaza, with her.

Meet the Artist: Jiří Harcuba & April Surgent
Transcript

Corning Museum of Glass, June 24, 2010 Tina Oldknow:  Thank you all very much for coming out tonight.  I think many of you will remember the snowstorm that you braved to hear Dante Marioni speak last February. Tonight is a thunderstorm that heralds the “Meet The Artist” lecture, which will be presented by a team of two artists: Jiří Harcuba from the Czech Republic and April Surgent from Seattle.