All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Glass Question at our Rakow Research Library.

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Vienna 1900, The Heart of Modernity | Behind the Glass Lecture
Video

Vienna in 1900 was at the heart of European modernity as a unique set of circumstances gave rise to a new and modern life there. Watch Janis Staggs, director of curatorial and manager of publications at the Neue Galerie in New York, explore this rich period in history. This Behind the Glass lecture

December 2300° Guest Artist Demo featuring Todd Ortega, Nikolai Morse, Jason Howard & Scott Griffin
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Happy Holidays from The Corning Museum of Glass! Watch the demo from the December 2018 2300° event featuring Todd Ortega, Nikolai Morse, Jason Howard, and Scott Griffin. In this demo, they construct a glass holiday tree with ornaments. The Guest Artist Series features world-class visiting artists

Baccarat
Article

The Compagnie des Verreries et Cristalleries de Baccarat, the most famous name in French glass, was founded in 1764 by Monseigneur de Montmorency-­Laval, the bishop of Metz, as a way to utilize the wood on the heavily forested land of his estate. In its early years, the factory operated under the

The Eastern Connection
Article

In the 19th century, at the very time when glassmakers were improving their skill in fashioning and annealing the large pieces that would be needed to create furniture, the number of contacts between Europe and countries to the east was increasing, and both England and France were expanding their

Glass Furniture in the 19th Century
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Today, it is not at all unusual to find glass tables and cabinets, as well as large glass lighting devices. But in the second half of the 19th century, when glass was first used in furniture on a commercial basis, it would have been truly remarkable to see such objects. The development of glass

F.& C. Osler
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F.& C. Osler was probably the largest European company that supplied glass objects to India. Its products sold there included both table wares and lighting devices. During the last quarter of the 1800s and the early years of the following century, Osler also made glass fountains and furniture

Jonas Defries & Sons
Article

One of the largest but least-known 19th-century English glass firms is Jonas Defries & Sons, which was located in the Houndsditch section of London from 1856 until the early 20th century. The company operated under various names for at least a century (an 1880 advertisement says that it was

Coalbourne Hill Glass Works
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The third English Company that made furniture for the Indian market was located in the Stourbridge area. This factory had been built early in the 19th century, and it was purchased by Joseph Webb in 1850. He was a cousin of Thomas Webb, owner of the famous glass firm of Thomas Webb & Sons, and

An Anglo-Saxon Cone Beaker from Faversham
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The beaker (Figs. 1 and 2), in the collection of The Corning Museum of Glass, may be described as follows: Cone beaker [85.1.4] Anglo-Saxon Probably seventh century H. 17.6 cm, D. (rim) 8.5 cm. Transparent yellowish-amber glass with many bubbles. Rim outsplayed, turned inward and downward; body

Leaf Beakers and Roman Mold-blown Glass Production in the First Century A.D.
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In 1985, The J. Paul Getty Museum acquired a Roman mold-blown vessel that dates to the first century A.D. 1 Made of pale yellow-green glass, the beaker was blown in a three-part mold. 2 Its exterior decoration consists of a simply designed foliate relief frieze of four vertical plants, each of

An Inlaid Glass Plate in Athens: Laboratory Examination
Article

Introduction In recent years it has become apparent that laboratory examinations of ancient glass might provide archaeologists and historians with valuable information about both ancient glass and the history of technology. At present several scientists working in this field are developing those

Cut Glass Lamps Attributed to The Union Flint Glass Works, Kensington, Philadelphia
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Relatively little is known about cut glass made in the United States from about 1810 to 1840. It was strongly influenced by Anglo-Irish cut glass designs, both in form and decorative motifs. Generally, most of it is attributed to Pittsburgh glasshouses, notably Bakewell’s, largely because of

Corning's Near Neighbors: The Cut Glass Companies of the Elmira, New York, Area
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The Elmira Cut Glass Company, the Enterprise Cut Glass Company of Elmira Heights, and Elmira's Majestic Cut Glass Company were three of the many small glass cutting firms that operated in the Southern Tier of New York State during the first two decades of the 20th century. There was a much

Enameled Glass Vessels, 1425 B.C.E.–1800: The Decorating Process
Article

The earliest glass vessel decorated with enameling dates from about 1425 B.C.E. 1 It successfully combines one of humankind’s oldest creative urges (the desire to draw on things) with one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world (glassmaking). Today, essentially the same process

A Passion Bottle by Alexandre Soudart
Article

Since 1977, the collections of The Corning Museum of Glass have included a rather curious object. 1 It is a tall, footed, cylindrical bottle of colorless glass, in which float numerous small lampworked figures suspended from buoyant glass bubbles (Fig. 1). The top of the bottle is sealed, forming a

An Observation on the Corinth Diatretum
Article

A great deal of attention has been directed toward understanding how Roman vasa diatreta were made. 1 Many of those who have handled the objects are convinced that they were made by deep cutting and undercutting heavy-walled blanks. Others have proposed explanations which require that the posts

Documented Use of Cup Plates in the Nineteenth Century
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Cup plates are an example of the specialized items in ceramics and glass with which Victorian ladies liked to clutter dinner and tea tables. Later in the century, these small plates were joined by a host of other "special" items: ice cream sets, berry sets, lemonade sets, and dishes for

Glass Lantern, Research Shed Light on 1860 Political Group
Article

Late in 1993, The Corning Museum of Glass received as a gift a brass lantern with a red glass globe [93.4.102] inscribed "ELMIRA WIDE AWAKES/ G.L.SMITH/CAPTAIN" (Fig. 1). This lantern had a mid-19th-century look, and I thought it might be an early product of the Corning Glass Works. I was

Glass for the King of Siam: Bernard Perrot’s Portrait Plaque of King Louis XIV and Its Trip to Asia
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In 2004, The Corning Museum of Glass acquired an oval cast glass plaque with the portrait of King Louis XIV (Fig. 1) of France (r. 1643–1715). It is the second plaque of its kind in the museum, and one of eight examples that are known (3 in the catalog below). This plaque was not purchased so that

Glasses with American Views
Article

Glasses engraved with scenic views or important buildings are part of a Germanic tradition dating to the eighteenth century. Similar commemorative glasses are noted in England, e.g., the well-known Sunderland Bridge rummers, but they are less common in English glass. Germanic glasses with this type

A Mold-Blown Bottle from the Workshop of Titianus Hyacinthus
Article

This note describes and illustrates a mold-blown square bottle with an inscription on the base. 1 Description The bottle (Fig. 1) is 18.9 centimeters high and is made of transparent bluish green glass. The body was blown in a mold with four vertical sections and a separate baseplate. The object is

Glasses with American Views – Addenda
Article

In 1977, the author discussed two groups of glasses engraved with American views, probably made in the United States but possibly abroad. 1 In the last two years, several more glasses in each of these groups have been discovered, along with some new information which is here presented. Five

Mythological Beakers: A Re-examination
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In 1972, Gladys Davidson Weinberg published a study of 24 vessels and fragments of a type of first-century A.D. mold-blown glass known as a mythological beaker. 1 While subsequent publications have included individual beakers and fragments, they have not been surveyed again as a group, 2 and they

The Glastenbury Glass Factory Company
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Presented here is a report of the excavation of the Glastenbury Glass Factory Company site in conjunction with the documentary evidence on the production and operations of this factory. This excavation, prompted by the imminent eradication of the site by the relocation of Connecticut Route 2 the

Gloucester Glass Works
Article

Clementon, New Jersey circa 1800-1825 The Gloucester Glass Works was apparently established about 1800 and from that date until about 1820 made a variety of bottles typical of the period. 1 From then until about 1825, the works seem to have been used for the production of window glass. On December

Conservation Live Stream: Glass from a Conservator's Perspective
Video

In this live stream from the Conservation Lab, watch as Steve Koob, chief conservator, Astrid van Giffen, associate conservator, and Lianne Uesato, assistant conservator share the issues and concerns that conservators keep an eye out for when managing a collection of glass objects that spans from

Practical Applications of Tension in Glass
Video

"Annealed glass," "safety glass," "tempered glass"... Confused? Learn the differences through these Glass Breaking Demos.

Glass Ribbon Machine
Video

Watch one of the world's fastest machines in action. After Thomas Edison developed a practical and durable light bulb filament in 1879, it took time for this technology to take hold, in part because it required a new product: glass envelopes to surround the filament. When Edison first

Fragile Legacy
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From their first commission for glass marine invertebrate models in 1863, to their later production of glass flowers for Harvard University’s well-known Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants, Leopold Blaschka (1822 – 1895) and his son Rudolf (1857 – 1939) masterfully captured in glass

Bridging Glass Art and Science | Behind the Glass Lecture
Video

Dr. Jane Cook moved four years ago from the anonymity of a bench scientist in Corning Inc.’s research laboratory to become a sought-after lecturer, consultant, teacher, and advisor to artists, curators, educators, and the public, at The Corning Museum of Glass and around the world. In this Behind

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