Session Schedule

Session Schedule

All sessions take place in the Auditorium of The Corning Museum of Glass, unless otherwise noted. Schedule is subject to change.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20

8 am to 9 am
Registration and Light Breakfast
Auditorium

9 am to 9:45 am
Welcome and New Acquisitions
Mosiacs in Antiquity: Tiffany's Inspiration from the Past
Karol Wight, President and Executive Director, The Corning Museum of Glass
Auditorium
One of Tiffany’s primary artistic inspirations was the 19th century archaeological excavations of the classical world. They captivated the public and influenced the design of urban architecture and decorative interiors. Providing a historical overview of glass mosaic production, from antiquity through the Renaissance, Wight will highlight examples that inspired Tiffany’s mosaic designs. Combined with the company’s innovations in glass, Tiffany established a bold new aesthetic for mosaics and introduced a uniquely American character to the millennia-old art form.

9:45 am to 10:30 am
Brief but Brilliant: J.A. Holzer’s Career Designing Glass Mosaics

Elizabeth De Rosa, Ph.D. Independent Scholar and Curator
Auditorium
Swiss-born Jacob Adolphus Holzer (1858-1938) emigrated to the United States as a teenager and worked as the lead designer of Tiffany’s glass mosaics for fewer than 10 years, from about 1888 until 1897. During that period, he supervised complex mosaic installations and designed several of the most important mosaic ensembles produced by the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company. Dr. De Rosa will examine Holzer’s contributions to mosaic design, focusing on works created for a variety of building types including a grand public library, a commercial office building, a university assembly hall and a church.

10:30 am to 10:45 am
Coffee Break

10:45 am to 11:30 am
The Dream Team Before the Dream Garden
Jennifer Perry Thalheimer, Curator and Collection Manager, The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art
Auditorium
The glorious mosaics created by Louis C. Tiffany’s firm were an amalgamation of efforts from a highly-coordinated and skilled team of workers. Beyond the generally acknowledged Studio and its designers — often heralded in catalogs and in the press — there were highly-specialized and accomplished craftspeople responsible for the intricacies of creation from the production of glass to the final installation. Artist and artisan depended upon one another for the ultimate success of the final artwork. Their stories, discovered through original work documents, photographs, and news accounts unveil the reality and outline the legacy of these masters of their craft.

11:30 am to 12:15 pm
Accrington: A Place for Tiffany Glass
Gillian Berry, Deputy Manager and Curator, Haworth Art Gallery
Auditorium
Joseph Briggs was born in Accrington to aspirational working class parents; he went on to form an extraordinary working relationship with Louis Comfort Tiffany, becoming manager of the mosaic and stained glass department and eventually becoming the manager of Tiffany Studios. Haworth Art Gallery, in Accrington, England, houses a legacy of Joseph Briggs in the form of a collection of Tiffany glass. Rather than representing Briggs’ contribution to Tiffany glass and the story of Tiffany glass, the current exhibition in Accrington focuses on one man, Louis Comfort Tiffany, even though many designers, scientists and artisans were involved in making the predominantly glass designs. Exhibitions of decorative art have tended to focus on the elite art narratives presented by the Authorised Heritage Discourse, leaving the exhibition and the collection without a context. Joseph Brigg’s upbringing, the conditions he lived in, his education, his experience of working in a cotton mill and the reasons he went to America and excelled in the glass industry is a little known history. This lecture seeks to reveal the influence of Accrington on American Art Nouveau and Tiffany glass.

12:15 pm to 1:30 pm
Lunch

1:30 pm to 2:15 pm
Design Drawings for Mosaics from the Studios of Louis C. Tiffany: Some New Discoveries

Alice “Nonnie” Cooney Frelinghuysen, Anthony W. and Lulu C. Wang Curator of American Decorative Arts, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Auditorium
Drawn from the large collection of design drawings from the studios of Louis C. Tiffany at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, this lecture will present a range of commissions that incorporate mosaic work. Spanning some 30 years, the holdings include domestic, commercial, and ecclesiastic work on varying scales. The drawings reveal new aspects of previously unknown works or works that were never executed, helping to elucidate the studio process.

2:15 pm to 3 pm
The Artistry and Innovation of Tiffany's Glass Mosaics
Lindsy Parrott, Director and Curator, The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass
Auditorium
Over the course of four decades, Louis C. Tiffany and his renowned studios pursued the art of mosaic with creative abandon. This lecture will examine the aesthetic evolution of Tiffany’s glass mosaics, from the 1880s through the early 1920s, and highlight the firm’s ongoing experimentations with color, reflectivity, translucency, and texture. A discussion of a variety of ecclesiastical and secular commissions will focus on Tiffany's expansion of the field of artistic mosaics in America by introducing new colors and types of glass into the works made under his supervision.

3 pm to 3:15 pm
Coffee Break

3:15 pm to 4 pm
The New Roles for Photography in Tiffany's Glass Mosaics

Andrew Fortune, Collections Photography Department Manager, The Corning Museum of Glass
Scott Sayre, Chief Digital Officer, The Corning Museum of Glass
Auditorium
In support of the Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics exhibition and the accompanying publication, The Corning Museum of Glass’s Collections Photography Manager Andy Fortune and his staff captured images of architectural mosaic installations in eight locations across New York State, six more sites in Philadelphia, Baltimore, Princeton, and Chicago. Highly reflective and often iridescent glass mosaics are difficult enough to photograph in the studio, but capturing them on location required adaptation of studio lighting techniques and specially modified equipment. Many of these mosaics had never been professionally photographed. In addition to their presentation in the exhibition and publication, the images serve a broader purpose as documentation of at-risk cultural treasures and as a record of current condition for conservation efforts.

Scott Sayre, Chief Digital Officer, will discuss the digital strategy for representing and interpreting architectural spaces in museum exhibitions. The solution for representing large-scale Tiffany mosaics situated in small towns as well as cities, in Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics resulted in a Mosaic Theater, a dramatic presentation incorporating movement and music.

4:15 pm to 5:15 pm
Tours

Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics Tour: Take a guided tour of this special exhibition and the topic of the Seminar on Glass.
Conservation Lab: See where CMoG’s conservation team conserves and prepares objects for display.
Rakow Research Library: Explore the foremost library for everything about glass.

5:30 pm to 6:30 pm
Cocktail Hour

6:30 pm to 9 pm
Dinner


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21

8:30 am to 9 am
Coffee and Light Breakfast
Auditorium

9 am to 10 am
Tours
Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics Tour: Take a guided tour of this special exhibition and the topic of the Seminar on Glass.
Conservation Lab: See where CMoG’s conservation team conserves and prepares objects for display.
Rakow Research Library: Explore the foremost library for everything about glass.

10 am to 10:15 am
Coffee Break

10:15 am to 11 am
Tiffany's New York in the Gilded Age: From Harbor Town to Cultural Capital, 1865-1890

Thomas Mellins, Independent Exhibition Curator and Architectural Historian
Auditorium
Between the cessation of the Civil War and the beginning of the last decade of the 19th century, New York City—Louis Comfort Tiffany's hometown—rapidly transformed itself from a populous but architecturally and artistically undistinguished harbor town into a world capital. Yet, though Gilded Age New York would proudly take its place on the world stage, the city, unlike many of its European counterparts, had not been forged primarily by governmental and religious forces, but rather by commerce, secular culture, and technology. As such, New York would set the standard for modern urbanism. Mellins will survey some of the era's defining public and commercial buildings, which served as the cultural context for Tiffany's achievement. Mellins will also outline some of the era's most significant architectural practitioners and stylistic trends.

11 am to 11:45 am
Tiffany’s Ecclesiastical Figural Mosaics
Natalie Z. Peters, Independent Art Scholar
Auditorium
For more than 40 years, Tiffany’s ecclesiastical department designed and produced large-scale figural mosaics for many of the nation’s most important churches. Inspired by historical examples, Tiffany’s modern method utilized glass material in innovative ways to convey dimensionality and movement, achieving a sense of realism in mosaic for the first time. The advancements Tiffany made in mosaic generated a new interest in mosaic art and its use in American ecclesiastical spaces. A survey of the firm’s most prominent figural commissions will demonstrate the breadth and variety of the company’s mosaic designs, as well as their significance as American religious art works.

11:45 am to 12:30 pm
Mining for Tiffany Mosaics in the Digital Age

Morgan Albahary, Curatorial and Collections Assistant of The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass
Auditorium
It is well known that Tiffany’s studios created mosaics for public, ecclesiastical, and residential commissions, but until recently, the full scope of this mosaic production was uncertain. Mining a combination of obscure newspapers and periodicals, church archives, and social media platforms such as Facebook and Instagram, Albahary identified over 220 Tiffany mosaics stretching from Canada to Mexico and from Maine to California. These findings are chronicled in a detailed appendix for the Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics publication, the most comprehensive list to date. She will discuss her research methodology and highlight some of the exciting discoveries made along the way as well as subsequent finds.

12:30 pm to 1:30 pm
Lunch

1:30 pm to 2:15 pm
Drawing, Photography, and the Design of Tiffany Studios’ Te Deum Laudamus Mosaic Triptych
Marina Ruiz Molina, Associate Conservator, Paper Conservation, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Christine Olson, Independent Scholar
Auditorium
Marina Ruiz Molina and Christine Olson will present a collaborative study that incorporates both technical analysis and art historical research to establish the chronological evolution of the Te Deum Laudamus glass mosaic triptych through the many stages of its production. The Te Deum Laudamus commission demonstrates the roles that drawing and photography played in the creation of monumental mosaics. The lecture will explore the designers’ individual artistic process; the communication between artists, clients, and workers; the technical execution of the artist’s designs; and the publication and promotion of the Tiffany Studios material. The lecture is based on an essay Molina and Olson co-authored and published in the Metropolitan Museum Journal, Volume 51.

2:15 pm to 3 pm
The Art of the American West: Colonial Portraiture, Landscapes, and the Driving Force of Manifest Destiny

Ellen Caldwell, Professor of Art History, Mt. San Antonio College
Auditorium
Chicago’s Marquette Building houses one of Louis C. Tiffany’s most exquisite glass mosaic murals, Jacques Marquette’s Expedition. In it, a series of panels depicts Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet’s expedition down the Mississippi River, where they interacted with American Indians of the Illinois confederacy. The American Indians represented in the Tiffany mosaic, however, are presented as Plains Indians (through clothing and accessories), a common stereotype given the date the mosaic was created. Caldwell will situate this mosaic and portraiture historically and stylistically within American art produced at the time Tiffany created the mosaic. Through an exploration of paintings, drawings, and film, Caldwell will present a series of historical colonial portraits and landscapes of the American West to explain some of the inaccuracies and stereotypes perpetuated as a common underlying political tension present in American frontier art of this time.

3 pm to 3:15 pm
Coffee Break

3:15 pm to 4 pm
Bringing it Home: Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics in the Domestic Sphere
Kelly Conway, Curator of American Glass, The Corning Museum of Glass
Auditorium
Tiffany Studios greatly expanded their mosaic production in the first decade of the 20th century to include utilitarian objects such as lamps and desk accessories, but also small-scaled domestic architectural elements like decorative panels and fireplace mantels. The company successfully navigated the rapidly changing retail economy of the United States and established itself as a modern luxury firm.

4 pm to 6 pm
Cocktails, Hot Glass Demo, and Booksigning

Amphitheater