Session Schedule

Session Schedule

All sessions take place in the Auditorium of The Corning Museum of Glass, unless otherwise noted. Schedule is subject to change.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19

8 am to 9:15 am
Registration and Light Breakfast
Auditorium

9:15 am to 9:45 am
Welcome and New Acquisitions
Karol Wight, President and Executive Director, The Corning Museum of Glass
Auditorium

9:45 am to 10:30 am
One Frenchman’s glass cutting machinery and another’s lenses: The Brooklyn Flint Glass Company’s prize-winning products in the 1850s
Ian Simmonds, Independent Scholar
Auditorium
The decade before it relocated to Corning, the Brooklyn Flint Glass Company received a prize for glass of superior brilliancy and for its display of rich cut glass. While the brilliancy was due to company founder John Gilliland, novel forms and patterns were needed for Jean-Pierre Colné’s patent glass cutting machinery. However, Gilliland took credit for a uniquely-American take on another French invention, the Fresnel lighthouse lens. In explaining Colné’s ambitious machinery, this presentation will show a wide variety of glassware made by Corning’s predecessor, in Brooklyn, in the years before its relocation to Steuben County.

10:30 am to 10:45 am
Coffee Break

10:45 am to 11:30 am
Migrating Glass Cutters
Curt Pederson, Principal Curator of Exhibitions and Collections, American Swedish Institute; Lars Hansson, Glass Factory; and Andrea C. Blum, Scholar
Auditorium
Migration has had effect on both the Swedish and American glass cutting industry between 1825 and 1945. During the great emigration period, 1840 to 1930, when 1.5 million Swedes emigrated to the United States, many glass cutters also went to the new country. This presentation, a collaboration between The Glass Factory, Boda glasbruk, Sweden and The American Swedish Institute, will examine the terms of the glass cutters in both the old and new country with a special case study on David Lonnquist, a Swedish glass cutter who emigrated to the United States and set up practice in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

11:30 am to 12:15 pm
Irish Cut and Engraved Glass from 1783 to circa 1950
Audrey Whitty, Keeper of the Art and Industrial Division, National Museum of Ireland
Auditorium
From the late 18th century until the mid-19th century, Irish glasshouses were established in the cities of Belfast, Cork, Dublin, and Waterford. This presentation will examine the cutting associated with Irish glass from circa 1783 until 1851, the year of the demise of the old Waterford factory, and the re-emergence of the technique in 1947-50 which led to the establishment of what would become the iconic brand of Waterford Crystal.

12:15 pm to 1:30 pm
Lunch

1:30 pm to 2:15 pm
Glass Cutting and Engraving at the Dorflinger Factory in White Mills, Pennsylvania

Jim Asselstine, Founder, President, and Director, Dorflinger Factory Museum
Auditorium
Asselstine will explore the techniques of glass cutting and engraving employed at the Dorflinger factory in White Mills from 1867 to 1921. His presentation will include images of the factory and its workers, actual cutting and engraving equipment used in the factory, and examples of the glass produced by the company during this remarkable period.

2:15 pm to 3 pm
Building on the Past: Traditional Techniques & New Aesthetics in Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937
Alexandra Ruggiero, Assistant Curator of Modern Glass, The Corning Museum of Glass
Auditorium
Glass of the Architects: Vienna, 1900-1937
presents a glimpse at glassmaking in turn of the century Austria, clearly demonstrating there wasn’t just one modern Austrian style; a variety of forms, techniques, and surface decorations are found in Austrian glass of this period. Intent on not simply copying historical styles, architects and designers were inspired by and built upon a multitude of traditions in glassmaking. Often working with the network of technical and design schools across central Europe, they married traditional glass techniques—including cutting and engraving—with new aesthetics.

3 pm to 3:15 pm
Coffee Break

3:15 pm to 4 pm
The Process Behind Beauty

Alex Schwarz, Glass Cutter and Educator at the Glasfachschule Kramsach, Austria
Auditorium
In this presentation, Schwarz will demonstrate the traditional techniques used by glass cutters to achieve the modern aesthetic seen in objects on view in Glass of the Architects: Vienna 1900-1937. Using two objects from the exhibit as examples, Schwarz will share his insight from a lifetime at the glasscutter’s lathe to highlight the challenges of executing these two distinct designs. He will also speak to the differences and similarities between glass cutting 100 years ago and today, and how the system of glass trade schools has influenced the culture and heritage of Austrian glass today.

4:15 pm to 5:15 pm
Tours

Glass of the Architects: Vienna 1900-1937 Tour: Take a guided tour of this special exhibition and the topic of the Seminar on Glass.
Corning, New York: The Crystal City Tour: Tour the new installation of the Museum’s Crystal City Gallery, created in celebration of the 150th anniversary of glassmaking coming to Corning, New York.
Conservation Lab: See where CMoG’s conservation team conserves and prepares objects for display.
Rakow Research Library: Explore the foremost library for everything about glass.

5:30 pm to 6:30 pm
Cocktail Hour

6:30 pm to 9 pm
Dinner


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

8:30 am to 9 am
Coffee and Light Breakfast
Auditorium

9 am to 10 am
Tours
Glass of the Architects: Vienna 1900-1937 Tour: Take a guided tour of this special exhibition and the topic of the Seminar on Glass.
Corning, New York: The Crystal City Tour: Tour the new installation of the Museum’s Crystal City Gallery, created in celebration of the 150th anniversary of glassmaking coming to Corning, New York.
Conservation Lab: See where CMoG’s conservation team conserves and prepares objects for display.
Rakow Research Library: Explore the foremost library for everything about glass.

10 am to 10:15 am
Coffee Break

10:15 am to 11 am
Mixing Art and Politics: Steuben's Asian Artists in Crystal

William Warmus, Fellow and former Curator of Modern Glass at The Corning Museum of Glass
Auditorium
Asian Artists in Crystal was described by Mary Jean Madigan in her definitive book about Steuben as, “Without question ... the crowning achievement of Steuben’s postwar history.” The exhibition was conceived during the Eisenhower presidency when the State Department suggested the project to Steuben as a way to showcase the creativity and cooperation of artists and craftsmen in Asia and America. Sixteen nations participated, and the exhibition opened at the National Gallery of Art in Washington in 1956, followed by an opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York a few months later. This lecture explores the aesthetic and political ramifications of the project.

11 am to 11:45 am
The Cut Glass Tradition in Austria and its impact on Modernity in Austrian Glass Making — Cut Glass for the Wiener Werkstätte
Rainald Franz, Curator of Glass and Ceramic Collection at MAK – Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art
Auditorium
The production of cut glass played an important role in Austrian Decorative Arts since the first half of the 19th century. The presentation of Austrian glass in the World Exhibitions since 1862 made it obvious that the traditional glass, rooted within the Biedermeier taste of the early 19th century, could no longer compete with modern British and French glass in form and decoration. The establishment of a system of special schools in the glassmaking provinces of the monarchy, to foster technical progress and aesthetic development paved the way towards modern design education. This presentation gives an overview of this development with original examples from the time and order books of the Wiener Werkstätte, kept in the MAK today.

11:45 am to 1:15 pm
Lunch

1:15 pm to 2 pm
The Iconographic Sources of Engraved Glass by Caspar Lehman
Adela Minarikova, Ph.D. Candidate, Charles University, Prague
Auditorium
Caspar Lehmann holds an exceptional position among glass and rock crystal engravers who worked at the end of the 16th and at beginning of the 17th century. His importance has been supported by large amount of archival materials, including a unique signed and dated piece called Lehmann’s beaker in the collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague. The engravings of three allegories on the Lehmann’s beaker have led to at least 25 other glass and rock crystal engravings assigned to Lehmann. The recognition of individual iconographic sources of early glass and rock crystal engravings can have essential significance for further research and the understanding of particular styles of engraving, the interpretation of their meaning, and even the dating of objects.

2 pm to 2:15 pm
Coffee Break

2:15 pm to 2:45 pm
"Can You Cut It?" Trivia Game
Auditorium
Join fellow Seminar attendees in a friendly team trivia challenge. The topic: cut and engraved glass, of course! Categories to include patterns, people & places, tools & techniques, and weird & wonderful. No need to sign up – your presence is all that’s required.

2:45 pm to 3:30 pm
Buying and Selling Brilliant Cut Glass

Kelly Conway, Curator of American Glass, The Corning Museum of Glass
Auditorium
Just nine years after opening, the T.G. Hawkes & Company won the grand prize for glassworks at the 1889 Paris World’s Fair, catapulting Corning’s reputation for brilliant cut glass to the forefront of the international market. This presentation will introduce the strategic marketing initiatives of Corning’s cut glass firms including distinguishing trademarks, distinctive pattern names, and targeted holiday and special occasion advertising. Where and how customers purchased their cut glass tableware evolved as cutting firms expanded their production to target the rapidly expanding middle class market. Conway will highlight many of the objects and stories newly on view in Museum’s refreshed Crystal City Gallery.

4 pm to 6 pm
Cocktails and Hot Glass Demo

Amphitheater
At the turn of the 20th century, Corning was known to the world as the “Crystal City.” Discover how glassmaking, and particularly the art of cut glass, came to be forever tied with a small town in upstate New York. This hot glass demonstration uniquely combines history with technique as our glassmakers, Chris Rochelle and Helen Tegeler, demonstrate the art-form and tell the story of how Corning came to be an artistic leader on a world-wide scale.