All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Glass Question at our Rakow Research Library.

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Libenský Installation- Family
Video

Listen as curator Tina Oldknow describes Meteor, Flower, Bird by Czech artists Stanislav Libenský and Jaroslava Brychtová. Libenský and Brychtová convey three messages with this sculpture: Meteor, on the left, represents Corning as an international center for the study of glass; the flower, in the

McElheny Untitled (White)- Family
Video

Listen as curator Tina Oldknow describes Untitled (White) by American artist Josiah McElheny, who reproduced well-known modern designs in opaque white glass. He pays homage to classic 20th-century design.

Tagliapietra Endeavor- Family Technique
Video

Listen as glass artist William Gudenrath describes the techniques Italian artist Lino Tagliapietra, one of the greatest living glass artists, used to create Endeavor. These 18 boats evoke the gondolas of Tagliapietra's native Venice. Each boat was blown and then cold worked to create the

Chihuly Fern Green Tower- Family
Video

Listen as curators Tina Oldknow and David Whitehouse describe Fern Green Tower by American artist Dale Chihuly. Northwest native Chihuly calls glass "the most magical of materials." He is probably the best-known artist working in blown glass today, and his sculptures and chandeliers are

Libenský Red Pyramid- Family
Video

Listen as curator Tina Oldknow describes Red Pyramid by Czech artists Stanislav Libenský and Jaroslava Brychtová. Libenský and Brychtová, a husband and wife team, collaborated for more than 40 years. These artists pioneered the technique of mold-melting, where chunks of glass are placed in molds,

McElheny Untitled (White)- Family Technique
Video

Listen as glass artist William Gudenrath describes the techniques American artist Josiah McElheny used to create Untitled (White). McElheny reproduced well-known modern designs in opaque white glass. He pays homage to classic 20th-century design.

Karel Black Cube- Family
Video

Listen as curator Tina Oldknow describes Black Cube by Czech artist Marian Karel. Despite its name, Black Cube is not really a cube. Each side slightly bulges as though there is some sort of energy pushing the walls outward.

Reynolds Family Matter- Family
Video

Listen as curator Tina Oldknow describes the object Family Matter by American artist Jill Reynolds.

Contemporary Chairs- Family
Video

Some of this furniture was designed to be used, while other pieces are purely decorative. Ghost Chair, on the left, is sturdy enough for use; likewise, Danny Lane's Etruscan Chair on the far right was also designed for sitting.

Libenský Installation- Family Technique
Video

Listen as glass artist William Gudenrath describes the techniques used to create Meteor, Flower, Bird by Czech artists Stanislav Libenský and Jaroslava Brychtová. Libenský and Brychtová convey three messages with this sculpture: Meteor, on the left, represents Corning as an international center for

Marquis Marquiscarpa- Family
Video

Listen as curator Tina Oldknow describes Marquiscarpa by American artist Richard Marquis. Using techniques that originated in Italy, Marquis pays homage to the great Italian designer Carlo Scarpa.

Tagliapietra Endeavor- Family
Video

Listen as curator Tina Oldknow describes Endeavor by Italian artist Lino Tagliapietra, one of the greatest living glass artists. These 18 boats evoke the gondolas of his native Venice. Each boat was blown and then cold worked to create the different surface textures.

Bertil Vallien, Unknown Destination II- Family
Video

Listen as curator Tina Oldknow describes Unknown Destination II by Swedish artist Bertil Vallien. Vallien created a series of boats that remind us of journeys. He filled the boats with objects that reference the past and time.

Paperweights- Family
Video

Listen as curator David Whitehouse describes the stages of making a paperweight.

You Design It, We Make It
Video

Try your hand at designing your own glass masterpiece. With You Design It, We Make It!, glassmaking comes alive for Museum guests of all ages. You Design It, We Make It! is a popular program available during the summer and some school breaks at The Corning Museum of Glass. Design a work on paper,

Trick Goblet (Family App)
Video

When you try to fill this glass with liquid, some of the tubes and bulbs remain empty. If you try to drink from the glass, the air in the tubes makes the liquid gush out when you least expect it.

Make Your Own Glass Ornament
Video

Try glassblowing at The Corning Museum of Glass (any age if accompanied by an adult).

Glass Harmonica Technique (Family App)
Video

Listen as glass artist William Gudenrath describes how this glass harmonica was made. Benjamin Franklin invented this strange musical instrument. It was popular in the late 18th century. Sounds were made by running moistened fingers along the rims of the glasses. Some people were afraid that this

European Glass (Family App)
Video

The European glass cases in the Museum tell the story of glass from the Renaissance in the 15th century to 1900. The Venetians were the master glassworkers of the Renaissance. Later, different parts of Europe produced their own distinctive styles. 

Bird-shaped Vessel (Technique- Family App)
Video

Listen as glass artist William Gudenrath describes the techniques used to make this bird-shaped vessel. This was an ancient Roman form of packaging. It was filled with perfume, then the tail was sealed by heating it in a flame. To extract the perfume, the user broke off the tip of the tail.

Marioni Chartreuse Pair- Family
Video

This particular type of pitcher is modeled after an ancient civilization in Italy called the Etruscans. It's called a becco di oca, which means "goose beak" in Italian.

Bird-shaped Vessel (Family App)
Video

This was an ancient Roman form of packaging. It was filled with perfume, then the tail was sealed by heating it in a flame. To extract the perfume, the user broke off the tip of the tail. 

Three Citrus Fruits (Family App)
Video

The Venetians were clever glassmakers. They could make bowls, goblets, and decorative objects such as these citrus fruits, which were meant to be suspended as ornaments.

Beaded Basket (Family App)
Video

Beadwork like this was popular in 17th-century England. A wire frame was formed and decorated with thousands of seed beads.

Uncut Crown of Glass (Family App)
Video

One traditional way of making flat glass was to open a bubble of molten glass as if to make a bowl. Using centrifugal force, the glassblower would spin the heated bowl and it would open into a flat disk.

Side Arm Press (Family App)
Video

The mass production of glass began in the 1820s, when the side-arm press was introduced. Using a press and a mold, two men could make about 100 glasses in an hour. Gift of Debra Ortello in loving memory of her husband, Vincent Ortello.

Hilton Innerland (Family App)
Video

Scottish artist Eric Hilton designed Innerland and master engravers at Steuben Glass translated Hilton's dream into tangible form. Wherever you look, you will find a different inner land.

Musler Cityscape (Family App)
Video

Artist Jay Musler took a hemisphere of industrially produced Pyrex, cut the rim in the form of an urban skyline (think of the skyscrapers of Manhattan), sandblasted it, and airbrushed it with oil paint.

Light Bulb Tester (Family App)
Video

The single light bulb is a replica of the first light bulb blown in Corning, NY, for inventor Thomas Alva Edison. The large object is a light bulb tester. Before purchasing light bulbs in a store, you would use the tester to see if your light bulb worked. 

Bedside Lamp (Family App)
Video

These bedside lamps, made in New England in the 1820s or 1830s, burned whale oil. This was readily available and it gave a good light. Whale oil remained popular until about 1860, when kerosene became available. Gift of Preston Bassett.

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