All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Glass Question at our Rakow Research Library.

Goblet made from Three Bubbles
Video

Three bubbles are attached to one another to create this goblet. The first bubble makes the bowl, the second creates the knop, and the third produces the foot. Learn more about this object in The Techniques of Renaissance Venetian Glassworking by William Gudenrath. The Venetian glass industry

Three-bubble Cup with Pineapple Dip Molding
Video

The bowl of this three-part goblet is made by using a pineapple dip mold. The object also includes a merese, a knop, and a foot. Learn more about this object in The Techniques of Renaissance Venetian Glassworking by William Gudenrath. The Venetian glass industry enjoyed a golden age during the

(No sound) Medieval Glass: Making a medieval goblet
Video

This video shows the technique of making a medieval goblet, an object in the exhibition Medieval Glass for Popes, Princes, and Peasants, on view at The Corning Museum of Glass from May 15, 2010 to January 2, 2011.

Making a Goblet from Parts
Video

It doesn't get more complicated than this! Here is the Renaissance Venetian way of making an ornate dragon-stemmed goblet. Pre-made parts are attached using small bits of molten glass as "glue."

(No sound) St. Augustin (Rouen) Goblet
Video

This video shows the technique of making a St. Augustin (Rouen) Goblet, an object in the exhibition Beyond Venice: Glass in Venetian Style 1500-1750, which was on view at The Corning Museum of Glass from May 20, 2004, to January 2, 2005.

Historical Glassmaking Techniques
Article

See glass scholar and artist William Gudenrath demonstrate historical glassmaking techniques. Façon de Venise Goblet Although in the 16th century the maximum penalty for a glassblower leaving Murano, the “glass island” of Venice, to work elsewhere was death, many did. The Low Countries became home