All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Glass Question at our Rakow Research Library.

An Anglo-Saxon Cone Beaker from Faversham
Article

The beaker (Figs. 1 and 2), in the collection of The Corning Museum of Glass, may be described as follows: Cone beaker [85.1.4] Anglo-Saxon Probably seventh century H. 17.6 cm, D. (rim) 8.5 cm. Transparent yellowish-amber glass with many bubbles. Rim outsplayed, turned inward and downward; body

A Mold-Blown Bottle from the Workshop of Titianus Hyacinthus
Article

This note describes and illustrates a mold-blown square bottle with an inscription on the base. 1 Description The bottle (Fig. 1) is 18.9 centimeters high and is made of transparent bluish green glass. The body was blown in a mold with four vertical sections and a separate baseplate. The object is

An Unusual Fragment of Cameo Glass
Article

The subject of this note is a fragment of cameo glass [59.1.509] (Figs. 1 and 2), now in The Corning Museum of Glass, that was formerly in the collection of Ray Winfield Smith. 1 It was shown in the 1957 exhibition Glass from the Ancient World as part of a group of early Islamic cameo glass, which

Early Islamic Gold Sandwich Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass
Article

This article reviews the current state of our knowledge of early Islamic gold sandwich glass and publishes five examples in the Museum's collection. In 1964, the Corning Museum acquired a gold sandwich glass cup [64.1.32] (Fig. 1) that was identified as “2nd–4th century A.D., Parthian or

Red Glasses from Beirut
Article

In his monumental study of documents from the Cairo Genizah, the late S.D. Goitein drew attention to a letter requesting, among other items, "a wickerwork basket with red glasses from Beirut, and if they cannot be had, white glasses." 1 The letter, which is written in Arabic but with

The Date of the Glass from Karanis
Article

Today, more than 60 years after its publication, Donald B. Harden's monograph on the glass from Karanis 1 is still one of the most frequently cited sources of information on the glass of Roman Egypt. The quantity of objects found at the site and their excellent state of preservation provided