All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Glass Question at our Rakow Research Library.

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Verzelini Goblet | Techniques of Renaissance Venetian-Style Glassworking
Video

This video shows the three parts—bowl, stem, and foot—attached directly from above without the use of mereses, which are more conventionally employed. Learn more about this object in The Techniques of Renaissance Venetian-Style Glassworking by William Gudenrath Between about 1500 and 1725, Venice

Openwork Goblet | Techniques of Renaissance Venetian-Style Glassworking
Video

In this video, first the bowl or cup is blown of colorless glass. Next, a series of solid and hollow elements are stacked, interrupted by three straps that create an open-work structure. Tiny raspberry prunts are added, and then a blown foot is attached. Finally, the rim is created while the vessel

Beaker | Techniques of Renaissance Venetian-Style Glassworking
Video

This video shows first the two types of required canes being made and arranged in a pattern on a ceramic plate. After the canes are fused together, a thick, cylindrical bubble of glass is rolled over the canes so that they become attached. After reheating, glassblowing is used to make the beaker.

Winged Glass | Techniques of Renaissance Venetian-Style Glassworking
Video

A partly hollow combination merese/avolio construction is added to the tip of a bubble of glass that eventually becomes the bowl (or cup). A complex, multi-part stem and foot are then attached. The vessel is completed while it is held by a pontil. Learn more about this object in The Techniques of

Stangenglas | Techniques of Renaissance Venetian-Style Glassworking
Video

This video shows retortoli canes being made and cut, then placed on a ceramic place-holding plate and then pre-heated. Next, a thick cylindrical bubble of glass is rolled over the canes, thus embedding them in its surface. Glassblowing is then used to make the vessel and its foot. Learn more about

Swiss Goblet | Techniques of Renaissance Venetian-Style Glassworking
Video

This video shows white canes of a small diameter being made. Next, the pre-heated canes are rolled up on the exterior of a thick-walled, cylindrical bubble of glass. This is then formed into a preliminary stem and foot construction, to be used later in the manufacturing process. The bowl is blown

Ferdinand II Beaker | Techniques of Renaissance Venetian-Style Glassworking
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This video shows the making of the vessel body and a small blown-foot with a folded edge. At the end of the glassblowing processes, a fin-mold is used to transform the upper-half of the vessel and the rim from a round to hexagonal shape. Learn more about this object in The Techniques of Renaissance

Bill Gudenrath Live-streamed Studio Demonstration (January 2019)
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An expert on Venetian glass, William Gudenrath taught students in his January 2019 class how to create well-formed and thinly-blown vessel bodies, excellent necks, delicate mereses, and blown feet and stems. In this demo from January 16, Gudenrath shares his knowledge of reticello —a type of blown

The Grand Bohemian Troupe of Fancy Glass Workers | Behind the Glass Lecture
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See The Grand Bohemian Troupe of Fancy Glass Workers at The Corning Museum of Glass! Over a span of 300 years, traveling flameworkers entertained and educated audiences around the world on the art, s­­cience, and skill of glassmaking. Learn about their lives and witness a modern take on their

Megan Stelljes Guest Artist Demonstration at 2300°
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Get ready to warm things up with Guest Artist Megan Stelljes in the Amphitheater Hot Shop during January's 2300°. In this demo, Stelljes creates a wine barrel with grapes to compliment the evening's wine tasting theme. See the final object out of the annealer starting at 1:40:51. Stelljes

Fred Kahl Live Streamed Studio Demonstration
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A pioneer in three-dimensional digital design, artist Fred Kahl is teaching students in his class how to create reusable graphite molds for glass casting. Get an insider’s view into the process during this live stream from the class Design, Carve, Pour on January 9. See the final piece starting at

David Sandidge Guest Artist Demonstration
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Watch as flameworker David Sandidge brings his fanciful glass figures to life during this demonstraton on January 11, 2019. See the final work starting at 1:56:20. The Guest Artist Series features world-class visiting artists at work in the Amphitheater Hot Shop. These special, extended

Penelope Rakov Live Streamed Studio Demonstration
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Artist Penelope Rakov was recently an artist-in-residence at The Studio where she focused on making murrine. Now as an instructor at The Studio, Rakov taught her students how to create different styles of murrine and how colors work together. Watch this January 23 live stream from the class Maximum

Glass Education Innovator: Boyd Sugiki
Article

Traditionally, glassblowing is learned first through observation, then by practice (and more practice!) Glass is a challenging medium and only dedicated glassblowing students will gain true competency to know what to do to achieve a desired design. Boyd Sugiki stands out among glass educators for

A Century of Pyrex
Article

America’s Favorite Dish: Celebrating a Century of Pyrex, on view June 6, 2015 through March 17, 2016 celebrates the 100 year anniversary of Pyrex, developed by Corning Glass Works in 1915. Born out of scientific discoveries in glass, and the emerging science of home economics, Pyrex was shaped not

Chemistry of Glass
Article

Thousands of different chemical compositions can be made into glass. Different formulas affect the mechanical, electrical, chemical, optical, and thermal properties of the glasses that are produced. There is no single chemical composition that characterizes all glass. Typical glass contains formers

Laboratory Studies of Some Glasses from Vergina
Article

Colorless Glasses in Antiquity Most glass objects of the second and first millennia B.C. were strongly colored, as are the precious stones they were meant to imitate. Those that were not intentionally colored usually had a pronounced greenish tint, owing to the presence of iron impurities

Tumblers, part 2
Video

In this video, artist Boyd Sugiki continues his discussion on tumblers and presents a demonstration including how to stretch the form, adjust pressure, straighten, thin and open the lips, and match heights to create a set. This video was produced by Boyd Sugiki in collaboration with The Studio at

Tumblers, part 1
Video

In this video, artist Boyd Sugiki discusses creating tumblers by working thinner, the turning speed, temperature and heat, color overlays, even stretching. This video was produced by Boyd Sugiki in collaboration with The Studio at The Corning Museum of Glass.

Turning
Video

In this video, artist Boyd Sugiki discusses turning basics including adjusting the speed of the turn and turning styles for different situations. This video was produced by Boyd Sugiki in collaboration with The Studio at The Corning Museum of Glass.

Vienna 1900, The Heart of Modernity | Behind the Glass Lecture
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Vienna in 1900 was at the heart of European modernity as a unique set of circumstances gave rise to a new and modern life there. Watch Janis Staggs, director of curatorial and manager of publications at the Neue Galerie in New York, explore this rich period in history. This Behind the Glass lecture

December 2300° Guest Artist Demo featuring Todd Ortega, Nikolai Morse, Jason Howard & Scott Griffin
Video

Happy Holidays from The Corning Museum of Glass! Watch the demo from the December 2018 2300° event featuring Todd Ortega, Nikolai Morse, Jason Howard, and Scott Griffin. In this demo, they construct a glass holiday tree with ornaments. The Guest Artist Series features world-class visiting artists

Baccarat
Article

The Compagnie des Verreries et Cristalleries de Baccarat, the most famous name in French glass, was founded in 1764 by Monseigneur de Montmorency-­Laval, the bishop of Metz, as a way to utilize the wood on the heavily forested land of his estate. In its early years, the factory operated under the

The Eastern Connection
Article

In the 19th century, at the very time when glassmakers were improving their skill in fashioning and annealing the large pieces that would be needed to create furniture, the number of contacts between Europe and countries to the east was increasing, and both England and France were expanding their

Glass Furniture in the 19th Century
Article

Today, it is not at all unusual to find glass tables and cabinets, as well as large glass lighting devices. But in the second half of the 19th century, when glass was first used in furniture on a commercial basis, it would have been truly remarkable to see such objects. The development of glass

F.& C. Osler
Article

F.& C. Osler was probably the largest European company that supplied glass objects to India. Its products sold there included both table wares and lighting devices. During the last quarter of the 1800s and the early years of the following century, Osler also made glass fountains and furniture

Jonas Defries & Sons
Article

One of the largest but least-known 19th-century English glass firms is Jonas Defries & Sons, which was located in the Houndsditch section of London from 1856 until the early 20th century. The company operated under various names for at least a century (an 1880 advertisement says that it was

Coalbourne Hill Glass Works
Article

The third English Company that made furniture for the Indian market was located in the Stourbridge area. This factory had been built early in the 19th century, and it was purchased by Joseph Webb in 1850. He was a cousin of Thomas Webb, owner of the famous glass firm of Thomas Webb & Sons, and

An Anglo-Saxon Cone Beaker from Faversham
Article

The beaker (Figs. 1 and 2), in the collection of The Corning Museum of Glass, may be described as follows: Cone beaker [85.1.4] Anglo-Saxon Probably seventh century H. 17.6 cm, D. (rim) 8.5 cm. Transparent yellowish-amber glass with many bubbles. Rim outsplayed, turned inward and downward; body

Leaf Beakers and Roman Mold-blown Glass Production in the First Century A.D.
Article

In 1985, The J. Paul Getty Museum acquired a Roman mold-blown vessel that dates to the first century A.D. 1 Made of pale yellow-green glass, the beaker was blown in a three-part mold. 2 Its exterior decoration consists of a simply designed foliate relief frieze of four vertical plants, each of

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